Le cinéma français

Posted on 09. Apr, 2010 by in Culture, Film

Wow, guys. Great comments and discussion lately! But it’s Friday, so let’s take a break. Time for something a little less high-brow! (Intellectuel, according to my dictionary—Hichem, t’es d’accord avec cette traduction? Do you agree with this translation?).

YouTube Preview Image

Hier soir (last night), I stayed up till 2h du matin (2:00 in the morning!) to finish watching “Entre les murs,” a film released in the US as “The Class.” Normalement, je ne suis pas très fan du cinéma—normally, I’m not a big fan of cinema.  I get scared easily (« Le Roi Lion » m’a fait peur :  « The Lion King » scared me) and I’d rather be outside or talking to someone.

But foreign films show a world I want to learn about. Le cinéma français is probably the best way to start learning how people speak and live without buying a plane ticket. In this post, je vous présente my favorite way to work on le langage familier (colloquial language) : French-language cinema of today, le cinéma francophone d’aujourd’hui.

I can’t talk to you about Truffaut or Godard, famous, classic metteurs en scène (directors). If you’re into film, vous les connaissez déjà ; if you don’t already know them, jump on it. I’ve seen like five minutes of Truffaut’s chef d’œuvre (masterpiece), « Les 400 coups », and while I liked it, that’s not why I want to watch French movies. I look for the films produced recently, featuring modern stories, language and places.  

« Entre les murs » depicts une salle de classe typique ( a typical classroom) in a banlieue (suburb) of Paris. I won’t give away the story, which is subtly told, posing questions without answering them, but I very highly recommend it.

When I watch French films, I prefer them sous-titrés en français : subtitled in French. It makes it easier to follow the conversation and focus on new words and sentences structures. Essayez-le (try it)—you’ll be surprised how much you can understand with French sous-titres.

Je préfère les films avec des sous-titres en français, because they hone your listening comprehension. But if you can only find English subtitles, pleurez pas—don’t cry. If you listen carefully, you’ll learn new words, alongside their traduction anglaise. For example, hier soir I learned the word «pétasse » (skank). Okay, it’s not a word you’re going to find in Molière, but that’s exactly why you watch modern movies : for le langage moderne.

Here’s the trailer (la bande-annonce) for « Entre les murs, » sous-titré en anglais. Write any new words you learn in the comments. Allez, bon week-end !

2 Responses to “Le cinéma français”

  1. Suki 7 September 2010 at 5:18 am #

    Bonjour! Une question pour vous – où trouvez-vous des sous-titres en français? Partout sur l’internet, je ne trouve que des sous-titres en anglais! Merci en avance pour votre aide!

    (I’m also Anglophone, but learning French, and becoming a French cinema buff)

  2. Suki 7 September 2010 at 5:19 am #

    Oh, and Bon Courage with your French apprentissage too!


Leave a Reply