LearnGermanwith Us!

Start Learning!

German Language Blog

9 German Food & Drink Idioms Posted by on Apr 19, 2017 in Food, Language

Guten Tag! Ich hoffe, es geht euch alle gut. Recently I came across the German idiom klar wie Kloßbrühe, which is the German version of the English ‘clear as crystal’. In German, this idiom literally translates to ‘clear as dumpling broth’. In other words, it has nothing to do with crystal. It had me thinking about how many other idioms there are that have nothing to do with food in English, but whose German equivalents are centred around food and drink. Let’s begin.

 

eins

Dumpling of lobster, tiger prawn and salmon

‘klar wie Kloßbrühe’. Foto: sackerman519 on flickr.com under a CC license (CC BY 2.0)

German idiom: Klar wie Kloßbrühe
English: Clear as crystal/crystal clear
Literal translation of German idiom: ‘Clear as dumpling broth’

 

 

zwei

WURST

‘das ist mir Wurst’ Foto: gromgull on flickr.com under a CC license (CC BY 2.0)

German idiom: Das ist mir Wurst
English: I don’t care
Literal translation of German idiom: ‘That is sausage to me’

 

 

drei

Tomaten

‘Tomaten auf den Augen haben’ Foto: ohallmann on flickr.com under a CC license (CC BY 2.0)

German idiom: Tomaten auf den Augen haben
English: To have rose-tinted glasses on/to be ‘blind’
Literal translation of German idiom: ‘To have tomatoes on the eyes’

 

 

vier

WURST

WURST

‘eine Extrawurst verlangen’ Foto: gromgull on flickr.com under a CC license (CC BY 2.0)

German idiom: Eine Extrawurst verlangen
English: To demand special treatment
Literal translation of German idiom: ‘To demand an extra sausage’

 

fünf

Bier!

‘Das ist nicht dein Bier!’ Foto: ptthread on flickr.com under a CC license (CC BY 2.0)

German idiom: Das ist nicht dein Bier!
English: That’s none of your business!
Literal translation of German idiom: ‘That is not your beer!’

 

sechs

cookie

‘Du gehst mir auf den Keks’ Foto: idiot_girl on flickr.com under a CC license (CC by 2.0)

German idiom: Du gehst mir auf den Keks
English: You’re getting on my nerves
Literal translation of German idiom: ‘You’re getting on my biscuit/cookie’

 

sieben

New England Clam Chowder

‘Ein Haar in die Suppe haben’ Foto: pointnshoot on flickr.com under a CC license (CC by 2.0)

German idiom: Ein Haar in der Suppe haben
English: To have a fly in the ointment
Literal translation of German idiom: ‘To have a hair in the soup’

 

 

acht

Brezel

‘sich aufbrezeln’ Foto: oeschberghof on flickr.com under a CC license (CC BY-ND 2.0)

German idiom: Sich aufbrezeln
English: To doll oneself up/get ready to go out
Literal translation of German idiom: ‘To pretzel oneself up’

 

 

neun

German idiom: Alles hat ein Ende, nur die Wurst hat zwei
English: All good things come to an end/everything must end sometime
Literal translation of German idiom: ‘Everything has an end, only the sausage has two’

This one – Alles hat ein Ende, nur die Wurst hat zwei – even has its own song. Of course I am going to share it! 😉

If you’ve enjoyed this post, check out this one on German idioms that feature the Teufel – devil!

Bis bald,
Constanze

By the way… want more free language learning resources, advice, and news from Transparent Language? Sign up for our newsletter!

Tags: , , , , , ,
Share this:
Pin it

About the Author:Constanze

Servus! I'm Constanze. I'm half English and half German. My native language is English and I live in the UK, but my first language was (Bavarian) German. I write here because I'm passionate about my languages and my roots. I also work as a translator & group fitness instructor. Twitter: @constanzearnold


Comments:

  1. Zach:

    I like the phrase “Sich aufbrezeln” (probably because I like Brezeln). How does work in a sentence? Is it separable? Would it be “Wir brezeln sich für die Party auf”?

    • Constanze:

      @Zach I like Brezeln, too!! And yes, it would be separable: ‘Ich brezle mich auf’ ‘Wir brezeln uns auf’ etc.


Leave a comment: