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A Glossary for the Irish in ‘Neacha Neamhshaolta’ (Tríshúileach / Three-eyed, or Otherwise), Part / Cuid 2 Posted by on Feb 26, 2017 in Irish Language

(le Róislín)

Continuing with our “neacha neamhshaolta” vocabulary, here are some more words from the recent blogposts (naisc thíos), together with some synonyms:

aintéine: antenna, pl: aintéiní, for animals, but for radio or television reception, there is a different word, “aeróg” (more like “aerial”).  Both aintéiní and aeróga can be “inghiorraithe” (retractable).

lonrach: luminescent, also means “bright” (typically “geal“), shining (also “dealraitheach” or “taitneamhach“) or resplendent (also “dealraitheach,” once again, and “niamhrach” and “taibhseach“).  “Lonraigh,” the verb, means “shine” or “illumine.”

leath-thrédhearcach (one of my new favorite words in Irish): The hyphen is because the prefix “leath” ends in “th” and the “tré” of ”trédhearcach” gets lenited following “leath,” so it starts with “th.”  And then the “tré” triggers lenition of “dearcach.”  I haven’t seen “dearcach” used that much on its own.  A related word, “dearcadh” means “sight” or “view.”  “Dearcach” has two basic meanings: “far-seeing” (although “far-sighted” or “long-sighted” is usually “fadradharcach” or “fadamharcach“) and “considerate” (often “tuisceanach” or “cineálta“).  It is used in at least one other  compound word, “iardhearcach” (retrospective).

iomaire: ridge (typically for agriculture, as opposed to the ridge of a roof, which may be “mullach” or “cíor mhullaigh” or “buaic“).   The surname “Mac an Iomaire” (Ridge) is related but a near lookalike isn’t, as far as I can tell, Mac Con Iomaire (Montgomery).  Good luck telling them apart aurally, by the way — try saying them out loud to see what I mean.

gíreas:  ridge, in the brain (not in agriculture).  Never let it be said that vocabulary is a finite phenomenon.  Irish has a separate word for ridges in the brain, closely related to “gyrus,” the technical anatomical term used in English by medical professionals, but not, in my experience, used by the lay public, even when talking about the surface of the brain.  “Gyrus” is Latin and may be used in English in the medical context.

eitre: groove, also furrow, or rifling (in a gun)

sulcas: groove, especially , in the brain; sometimes translated as “sulcus,” the Latin medical term also used in English in fields such as dentistry (sulcas gingibheach, gingival sulcus) and animal anatomy (sulcas lárnach agus sulcais chomhthaobhacha i mbradán crúibe capaill, central sulcus and collateral sulci of the frog of a horse’s hoof, and remember this is “bradán” as in “fleshy pad in a hoof,” not as in the more widely used “bradán” (salmon).

And now that we’ve reviewed these, how about some practice?  Which form of any the Irish words above (key words or synonyms) fits the bearnaí (blanks) below?  You may need to make some adjustments for plural, lenition, etc.   Freagraí thíos.

  1. Cuirtear prátaí i(n) _____, ní i _____.
  2. Chonaic Daidí na Nollag soilse _____ an bhaile thíos agus é ag tarraingt ar an áit ina charr sleamhnáin.
  3. Tá craiceann an neach neamhshaolta sin _____ ach níl sé go hiomlán trédhearcach.
  4. Is siúnta “teanga agus _____” é an cineál siúnta sin [ag caint faoi adhmadóireacht]. Tugtar “siúnta fiacaile agus maint” ar an gcineál siúnta sin freisin.
  5. _____ inghiorraithe atá ar mo charr ach _____ inghiorraithe a bhí ag Uncail Máirtín sa chlár teilifíse My Favorite Martian.

Bhuel, sin é, dornán focal agus dornán abairtí le bearnaí le líonadh.  Freagraí thíos.  SGF — Róislín

Naisc: 
A Glossary for the Irish in ‘Neacha Neamhshaolta’ (Tríshúileach / Three-eyed, or Otherwise), Cuid / Part 1Posted by on Feb 24, 2017 in Irish Language

Design Your Own ‘Neach Neamhshaolta’ and Describe It in Irish, or, What’s the Gaeilge for ‘I Have Two Antennae, or Three Eyes or Four Opposable Thumbs’?Posted by on Feb 22, 2017 in Irish Language

Cineálacha Frasaíochta (Irish Terms for Types of Precipitation: Rain, Snow, Sleet, Hail) Posted by on Feb 16, 2017 in Irish Language (for the original inchinn neach neamhshaolta in this mionsraith ad hoc). 

Freagraí: 

    1. Cuirtear prátaí in iomairí, ní i ngíris.
    2. Chonaic Daidí na Nollag soilse lonracha an bhaile thíos ag é ag tarraingt ar an áit ina charr sleamhnáin.
    3. Tá craiceann an neach neamhshaolta sin leath-thrédhearcach ach níl sé go hiomlán trédhearcach.
    4. Is siúnta “teanga agus eitre” é an cineál siúnta sin [ag caint faoi adhmadóireacht]. Tugtar “siúnta fiacaile agus maint” ar an gcineál siúnta sin freisin.
    5. Aeróg inghiorraithe atá ar mo charr ach aintéiní inghiorraithe a bhí ag Uncail Máirtín sa chlár teilifíse My Favorite Martian.

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