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When In Rome ……. Posted by on Apr 20, 2017 in Humour

So, if you’ve studied our recent blog Parliamo Romanesco! you should be getting the hang of the Roman dialect by now, and ready for your next challenge. Here it is …

To get a real flavour of the Romano dialect it goes without saying that you need to hear it spoken, or sung, by a native of Rome. Who better, therefore, than Roman actor, comedian, singer, and director Gigi Proietti to provide us with a perfect example of ‘er Romanesco‘ at its finest.

In the following video, Proietti describes how, at a certain hour (“fra le due meno venti e le due e un quarto … alle due meno diciotto”) the ‘cantante da night’ (night club singer) would perform a song in il francese’ (French), which was considered very suave and intellectual.

The cantante would be dressed in black: “scarpe nere, pedalini neri, carzoni neri, mutande presumibilmente nere, majone nero di quelli che finiscono qua …”

Lighting a cigarette, the singer would prepare himself … and begin …

te me rompe er ca’
te me rompe er ca’
te me rompe er ca’
te me rompe er ca’ … etc.

ti m’ha rotto er ca’
ti m’ha rotto er ca’
ti m’ha rotto er ca’
ti m’ha rotto er ca’ … etc.

perciò …

si me rompe er ca’
si me rompe er ca’
si me rooooooooompe er ca’

At this point he would walk over to the piano and speak, repeating the same ‘concept’ that he had previously sung. “Parlava triste, malinconico, definitivo, amaro”:

no me no …
me no no …
non …
non me …
romp …
er ca’ no …

….…
toi a moi … nun m’ha da rompe er ca’ no no no

“e finiva sempre così”: (and he always ended like this):

ti m’ha rotto er ca’!

Now, if you refer back to Serena’s basic instructions for understanding Romanesco you should be able to provide us with a perfect translation.

We look forward to your comments, a presto! 😉

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Comments:

  1. Rita Kostopoulos:

    A noi Trump ci sta rompendo Il ——ca

  2. Anne:

    Molto divertente, e sì, mi ricordo questi cantori.

  3. John:

    Ciao Serena e Geoff,
    Non vedo l’ora di leggere la vostra traduzione. Non capisco affatto!
    A proposito, in inglese si dice spesso “supposed to”, per esempio, “it is supposed to rain today”. Comunque non sia una comune frase in italiano. Come se lo dice?
    Grazie.


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