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Getting the Genitive

Posted on 29. Jul, 2015 by in Latin Language

The genitive is one of my favorite cases. I feel it is one of the easiest cases to explain and learn!

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ADJECTIVAL USES:

  • (1) POSSESSIVE GENITIVE: “belonging to” “owned by”
  • periculum belli, coniuratio Catilinae (Conspiracy of Catiline)
  • (2) SUBJECTIVE GENITIVE: with a verbal noun (gerund) or a noun implying activity.
  • The AUTHOR OF THE ACTIVITY (In some grammars, this is seen as a special subdivision of the possessive genitive, an extension of the literal idea into the realm of responsibility).
  • metus hostium (`fear on the part of the enemy’ The enemy fear us.) coniuratio Catilinae
  • (3) OBJECTIVE GENITIVE denotes the object of the activity implied by a noun or adjective: metus hostium (`fear of the enemy’: We fear the enemy)
  • (4) PARTITIVE GENITIVE ) may denote the larger whole, from which something is derived; or of which something forms a part. This is often found with the indefinite noun. pars Galliae, satis sapientiae, nihil horum
  • (5) GENITIVE OF DEFINITION (Genitive of Material)  may define a common noun by giving a particular example of things belonging to that class:exemplum iustitiae “the example of justice”
  • (6) GENITIVE OF DESCRIPTION (Genitive of quality)  may describe a person or thing, by indicating size or measure (this is sometimes separately called `genitive of measure’); or by indicating some distinctive quality. vir magni ingeni(i) “a very talented man”
  • (7) GENITIVE OF VALUE and of price (though it may be adverbial in fact)

ADVERBIAL USES:

  • (1) With certain verbs: memini, obliviscor `remembering, forgetting, reminding’ (e.g.: memento mei)
  • (2) After utor, fruor, fungor, potior, vescor, opus est (Wheelock, p. 164)
  • potior, potiri “to gain power over” potitus rerum [“having gained control over public affairs”]
  • (3) After verbs meaning “to fill” (and adjectives of similar meaning, plenus aranearum)
  • (4) With verbs meaning “to pity”: taedet me vitae “I am bored with living.”
  • (5) With verbs denoting a judicial procedure: “accuse of” (genitive of the crime”) “charge someone with” “acquit someone of”

*Information has been taken from Latin textbooks, online resources, and youtube.

10 Amazing Ancient History Resources

Posted on 21. Jul, 2015 by in Roman culture

This week I wanted to review some great resources for learning and discovering the Ancient World. I have chosen five digital resources in which both the expert and novice can learn new and exciting information.

The reconstructed Temple of Trajan at Pergamon. Courtesy of WIkiCommons.

The reconstructed Temple of Trajan at Pergamon. Courtesy of WIkiCommons.

1.The Library of Congress (here)

The Library of Congress offers a sundry of information on primary and secondary sources. While the database is not the most exciting of this lot, the repetuation of the Library of Congress demonstrates the relevancy of these sources.

User: Advanced-Expert

A winner of a Roman chariot race, from the Red team.

A winner of a Roman chariot race, from the Red team.

Young aulos-player riding a dolphin: red-figure stamnos, ca 360-340 BCE, found in Etruria, (National Archeological Museum, Madrid).. Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Young aulos-player riding a dolphin: red-figure stamnos, ca 360-340 BCE, found in Etruria, (National Archeological Museum, Madrid).. Courtesy of WikiCommons.

  1. BBC Ancient History (here)

This website offers a limited area of coverage, but it does so in a manner that allows users to find information easier. All the information is categorized and laid out logically. However, this website is an archived website, which leads one to think that it does not receive adequate updates. This database does provide sources at the end of each article and the option for viewing galleries on the topic. However, the information is extremely basic and leaves more advanced learner wanting more.

User: Beginner, Intermediate

800px-Olympia_-_Hera_Temple

  1. History: Ancient History (here) 

This database is in partnership with the History Channel. The database is aesthetically pleasing to the eye and has an abundance of information.  The categories and areas of research are unparalleled to the previous sources. The database contains videos, photos, and tons of information. In addition, the posts and articles seem to be engaging and interesting. They resemble the “Buzzfeed” or “BookRiot” articles.

User: Beginner to Advanced

Commodus as Hercules, Capitoline Museums. Courtesy of WikiCommons and Marie-Lan-Nguyen.

Commodus as Hercules,
Capitoline Museums. Courtesy of WikiCommons and Marie-Lan-Nguyen.

  1. Ancient History Encyclopedia (here)

This databases is both engaging and colorful. The information is presented in a fresh and revigorating manner. In addition, there are various ways and methods for obtaining information from searching, indexing, timelines, or even maps. The information is constructed in a way that the beginner users would be able to navigate it well. In addition, the information is presented with pictures, videos, and references.

User: Beginner to Expert

10 AMAZING Latin Posts for the Latinist

Posted on 08. Jul, 2015 by in Latin Language

From the last two years as a Latin blogger I wanted to take this opportunity to go over my top 10 posts regarding Latin words, phrases, and quotes.

 

1.25 Latin Phrases Every Student Should Know

2.Latin: Love Quotes & How to write a love letter

3.Latin Profanity

4.Abbreviations in Latin

5.Popular Movie Quotes in Latin

6.Latin Facebook Challenge

7.Conversational Latin

8.200 Latin Roots

9. Popular Quotes Translated into Latin

10. 100 Most Common Latin Words

 

I hope you enjoy these and I look forward to next week’s post.