Archive for 'Latin Language'

The Pope’s Latin Tweets Soar!

Posted on 18. Feb, 2015 by in Latin Language

Some people say that Latin is a “dead” language, and you can hear my not-so sarcastic thoughts on that subject (here) in a post titled “If Latin is a dead language, Do zombies speak it?”

A generated meme created at Philosoraptor

A generated meme created at Philosoraptor

However, the trends of social media would prove that it is anything BUT dead! Facebook even offers the option to allow you to change your language to Latin! You can check out how to take the Latin Facebook Challenge: here.

Use Latin on Facebook! Like a Boss!

Use Latin on Facebook! Like a Boss!

Furthermore, I must hand it to Pope Francis for not deterring away from Latin too much. Late last year, I was highly disappointed in his decision to have Latin replaced by Italian as the Vatican synod’s official language. You can read more about this shift in tradition: here.

Pope Francis in August 2014. Courtesy of WikiCommons and Stemoc.

Pope Francis in August 2014. Courtesy of WikiCommons and Stemoc.

However,  Pope Francis’ twitter account in Latin has been a huge success with over 326,000 followers (as of 2/18/2015), which is more than those following papal tweets in German or Arabic. A link to Pope’s Francis Twitter Page (here). His homepage originally read “Welcome to the official Twitter page of His Holiness Pope Francis.” However for this Latin language page, it reads “Tuus adventus in paginam Papae Francisci breviloquentis optatissimus est.” How awesome is that!

So, I had to ask myself-who exactly is reading this. It is Latinists, Latin enthusiasts, interested and curious people? Daniel Gallagher, an expert in the language and member of the team in charge of translating and posting the pope’s tweets, said “We have every reason to think that many are young students, from universities, schools or even younger and that some use the tweets as homework, setting out to translate them.” He followed with saying “Others are journalists, lawyers, or people nostalgic for the Latin lessons of their youth, who get a kick out of translating a Francis phrase a day. Some get so involved that they reply to the pope’s tweets in Latin.”

This made me think, what an amazing way to practice Latin everyday! I would highly encourage it for anyone wanting to explore their Latin in a real-time and present circumstance.

Although Gallagher offers me another solution to “who is following these Latin tweets;” I was unsure if I truly believed that ALL 326,000 followers were Latin students of one sort or another. I mean, 326,000 does not sound like a population of a dead language. Albeit, Gallagher addresses this saying “Some follow the pope in Latin because it’s a way to create a group. They enjoy belonging to an unusual community, with its own code. If you are able to translate it, you are accepted into the club.”

Ah!

So, Latin is now a elitism hipster movement? So does that mean it making a comeback?  I am not really sure. I hope so.

Well, if you are not following the Pope- I would recommend it for the daily practice!

Valentine’s Day Tip: Add a Latin Love Quote!

Posted on 11. Feb, 2015 by in Latin Language

Happy Valentine’s Day Everyone!

I hope everyone is ready for the upcoming holiday even if it is for an “Anti-Valentine’s Day.” I hope your Valentine’s Day or Lupercalia is filled with happiness and joy or at least lots of sweets and good movies or books.If you want to know the Ancient Roman history and festivals behind Valentine’d Day, I would recommend this fun read ” Lupercalia: The Ancient Roman Love Holiday Before Valentine’s Day”(here).

For those of you who are writing love letters to your loved ones (family, friends, wife, betrothed,etc)- here are some awesome phrases to spice up your cards and letters!

QUOTES

Valentines Day Candy. Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Valentines Day Candy. Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Te amo “I love you”

Eis quos amo “For those that I love”

Una in perpetuum “Together forever”

Amor vincit omnia “Love conquers all”

Amor meus amplior quam verba est “My love is more than words”

Omnia vincit amor; et nos cedamus amori “Love conquers all things; let us too surrender to love” (Vergil)

A blindfolded, armed Cupid (1452/66) by Piero della Francesca

A blindfolded, armed Cupid (1452/66) by Piero della Francesca

Amor animi arbitrio sumitur, non ponitur “We choose to love, we do not choose to cease loving” (Syrus)

Illis quos amo deserviam “For those I love I will sacrifice”

In aeternum te amabo “I will love you for all eternity”

In perpetuum et unum diem “Forever and a Day”

Antique Valentine's card. Courtesy of Wikicommons.

Antique Valentine’s card. Courtesy of Wikicommons.

Quos amor verus tenuit, tenebit “True love will hold on to those whom it has held” (Seneca)

Si vis amari, ama “If you wish to be loved, love” (Seneca)

Amor caecus est “Love is blind”

Amor sempiternus “Eternal Love”

Tibi magno cum amor “For you with great love”

Te valde amo ac semper amabo “I love you very much, and always will forever”

Valentines Day Chocolate. Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Valentines Day Chocolate. Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Numquam periit amor “Love never dies”

Ab imo pectore “From the bottom of my heart”

Nunc scio quid sit amor “Now I know what love is”

Numquam te amare desistam “I’ll never stop loving you”

Etiam in morte, superest amor “In death, love survives”

Amor and Psyche by Antonio Canova, Louvre

Amor and Psyche by Antonio Canova, Louvre

Fide et amor“Faithfully and lovingly”

Tuus perdite sodalis amans “Your ever loving soul mate”

Sine amor, nihil est vita “Without love, life is pointless”

Nunc scio quid sit amor “Now I know what love is”

Semper fidelis “Always faithful”

If these quotes are not enough for your thirst of love,  you can also check out this post “How to Write a Love Letter in Latin” (here).

10 Favorite Children’s Book Translated in Latin

Posted on 28. Jan, 2015 by in Latin Language

Salvete Omnes,

It is my opinion that everything…and I mean EVERYTHING… is better in Latin. I am a firm believer that languages are easier to learn the younger you are, and this is why I encourage anyone to teach their young relatives a second language early! How awesome would it be to have your child reading Latin at 7! The great thing I love about these books is that there are English texts which you can own or borrow from your local library to compare your translations!

Courtesy of Mememaker.

Courtesy of Mememaker.

Click through to see your favorite children’s books translated into Latin — though many of these have been around for a while, we find them endlessly charming.

Olivia: The Essential (Latin Edition) by Ian Falcone

Olivia and mum - Myer Christmas Windows 2009. Courtesy of Flickr Commons.

Olivia and mum – Myer Christmas Windows 2009. Courtesy of Flickr Commons.

You can read a glimpse of it here!

Ferdinandus Taurus (Latin Edition) by Munro Leaf

YouTube Preview Image

You can read a glimpse of it here!

Winnie Ille Pu (Latin Edition) by A. A. Milne

YouTube Preview Image

 

Et nisus est
et
nisus est
et
nisus est
et
nisus est
et nitens carmen sic coepit canere:
Cur ursus clamat?
Cur adeo mel amat?
Burr, burr, burr
Quid est causae cur?

He
climbed
and he
climbed
and he
climbed,
and as he
climbed
he
sang
a little
song
to himself.
It went
like this:
Isn’t it funny
How a bear likes honey
Buzz! Buzz! Buzz!
I wonder why he does?

Casttus Petasatus: The Cat in the Hat in Latin (Latin Edition) by Dr. Seuss

YouTube Preview Image

Read a glimpse of it here!

Harrius Potter et Philosophi Lapis (Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, Latin edition) by J. K. Rowling

Courtesy of Halle Stoutzenberger & Flickr Commons.

Courtesy of Halle Stoutzenberger & Flickr Commons.

Read some of the book here.

Arbor Alma/ The Giving Tree (Latin Edition) by Shel Silverstein

YouTube Preview Image

Read a glimpse of the book here!

Robinson Secundus: Robinson in Christian Latin (Latin Edition) by Joach. Henr. Campe

Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Read some of the book here!

Insula Thesauraria (Latin Edition) by Robertus Ludovicus Stevenson

Treasure Island Cover & Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Treasure Island Cover & Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Read a glimpse of it here!

Quomodo Invidiosulus Nomine Grinchus Christi Natalem Abrogaverit by Dr. Seuss

Courtesy of Denise Krebs & Flickr Commons.

Courtesy of Denise Krebs & Flickr Commons.

Read some of it now here!

Virent Ova! Virent Perna!! by Dr. Seuss

Read a portion of it here!