Tag Archives: Latin language

Valentine’s Day Tip: Add a Latin Love Quote!

Posted on 11. Feb, 2015 by in Latin Language

Happy Valentine’s Day Everyone!

I hope everyone is ready for the upcoming holiday even if it is for an “Anti-Valentine’s Day.” I hope your Valentine’s Day or Lupercalia is filled with happiness and joy or at least lots of sweets and good movies or books.If you want to know the Ancient Roman history and festivals behind Valentine’d Day, I would recommend this fun read ” Lupercalia: The Ancient Roman Love Holiday Before Valentine’s Day”(here).

For those of you who are writing love letters to your loved ones (family, friends, wife, betrothed,etc)- here are some awesome phrases to spice up your cards and letters!

QUOTES

Valentines Day Candy. Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Valentines Day Candy. Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Te amo “I love you”

Eis quos amo “For those that I love”

Una in perpetuum “Together forever”

Amor vincit omnia “Love conquers all”

Amor meus amplior quam verba est “My love is more than words”

Omnia vincit amor; et nos cedamus amori “Love conquers all things; let us too surrender to love” (Vergil)

A blindfolded, armed Cupid (1452/66) by Piero della Francesca

A blindfolded, armed Cupid (1452/66) by Piero della Francesca

Amor animi arbitrio sumitur, non ponitur “We choose to love, we do not choose to cease loving” (Syrus)

Illis quos amo deserviam “For those I love I will sacrifice”

In aeternum te amabo “I will love you for all eternity”

In perpetuum et unum diem “Forever and a Day”

Antique Valentine's card. Courtesy of Wikicommons.

Antique Valentine’s card. Courtesy of Wikicommons.

Quos amor verus tenuit, tenebit “True love will hold on to those whom it has held” (Seneca)

Si vis amari, ama “If you wish to be loved, love” (Seneca)

Amor caecus est “Love is blind”

Amor sempiternus “Eternal Love”

Tibi magno cum amor “For you with great love”

Te valde amo ac semper amabo “I love you very much, and always will forever”

Valentines Day Chocolate. Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Valentines Day Chocolate. Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Numquam periit amor “Love never dies”

Ab imo pectore “From the bottom of my heart”

Nunc scio quid sit amor “Now I know what love is”

Numquam te amare desistam “I’ll never stop loving you”

Etiam in morte, superest amor “In death, love survives”

Amor and Psyche by Antonio Canova, Louvre

Amor and Psyche by Antonio Canova, Louvre

Fide et amor“Faithfully and lovingly”

Tuus perdite sodalis amans “Your ever loving soul mate”

Sine amor, nihil est vita “Without love, life is pointless”

Nunc scio quid sit amor “Now I know what love is”

Semper fidelis “Always faithful”

If these quotes are not enough for your thirst of love,  you can also check out this post “How to Write a Love Letter in Latin” (here).

10 Favorite Children’s Book Translated in Latin

Posted on 28. Jan, 2015 by in Latin Language

Salvete Omnes,

It is my opinion that everything…and I mean EVERYTHING… is better in Latin. I am a firm believer that languages are easier to learn the younger you are, and this is why I encourage anyone to teach their young relatives a second language early! How awesome would it be to have your child reading Latin at 7! The great thing I love about these books is that there are English texts which you can own or borrow from your local library to compare your translations!

Courtesy of Mememaker.

Courtesy of Mememaker.

Click through to see your favorite children’s books translated into Latin — though many of these have been around for a while, we find them endlessly charming.

Olivia: The Essential (Latin Edition) by Ian Falcone

Olivia and mum - Myer Christmas Windows 2009. Courtesy of Flickr Commons.

Olivia and mum – Myer Christmas Windows 2009. Courtesy of Flickr Commons.

You can read a glimpse of it here!

Ferdinandus Taurus (Latin Edition) by Munro Leaf

YouTube Preview Image

You can read a glimpse of it here!

Winnie Ille Pu (Latin Edition) by A. A. Milne

YouTube Preview Image

 

Et nisus est
et
nisus est
et
nisus est
et
nisus est
et nitens carmen sic coepit canere:
Cur ursus clamat?
Cur adeo mel amat?
Burr, burr, burr
Quid est causae cur?

He
climbed
and he
climbed
and he
climbed,
and as he
climbed
he
sang
a little
song
to himself.
It went
like this:
Isn’t it funny
How a bear likes honey
Buzz! Buzz! Buzz!
I wonder why he does?

Casttus Petasatus: The Cat in the Hat in Latin (Latin Edition) by Dr. Seuss

YouTube Preview Image

Read a glimpse of it here!

Harrius Potter et Philosophi Lapis (Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, Latin edition) by J. K. Rowling

Courtesy of Halle Stoutzenberger & Flickr Commons.

Courtesy of Halle Stoutzenberger & Flickr Commons.

Read some of the book here.

Arbor Alma/ The Giving Tree (Latin Edition) by Shel Silverstein

YouTube Preview Image

Read a glimpse of the book here!

Robinson Secundus: Robinson in Christian Latin (Latin Edition) by Joach. Henr. Campe

Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Read some of the book here!

Insula Thesauraria (Latin Edition) by Robertus Ludovicus Stevenson

Treasure Island Cover & Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Treasure Island Cover & Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Read a glimpse of it here!

Quomodo Invidiosulus Nomine Grinchus Christi Natalem Abrogaverit by Dr. Seuss

Courtesy of Denise Krebs & Flickr Commons.

Courtesy of Denise Krebs & Flickr Commons.

Read some of it now here!

Virent Ova! Virent Perna!! by Dr. Seuss

Read a portion of it here!

 

Latin Profanity: How to Swear in Latin

Posted on 13. Jan, 2015 by in Latin Language

Salvete Omnes,

With the beginning of the New Year, I know many people have started about learning a language for a resolutions.  While last week’s post discussed the top ten posts to help inspire and teach the language to beginners.

images

Courtesy of Mememaker.

WARNING: This post is not for the faint hearted. Romans were swearing and cursing in literature, poetry, and graffiti at the beginning of Western Civilizations. Since profanities are informal (and should not be used in public) and more often spoken than in literature, it is worthwhile to note several written sources of Latin profanity:

Courtesy of ecards.

Courtesy of ecards.

  • The satirical poets (Catullus and Martial) use the words in literary texts.
  • The orator and lawyer Cicero’s Epistulae ad Familiares (“Letters to My Friends”) confirm the “profane” or “obscene” status of many Latin words.
  • Graffiti from the Roman period, scrawled notably on the walls of Pompeii and Herculaneum.  We have a post on entitled: Ten Ancient Roman Graffiti Inscriptions.

dfafd

 

BASIC CURSE WORDS: EXCLAMATIONS!

  • “faex” – sh*t
  • “cane” – bitch (this is actually referring to a dog, however, and not the female derogatory)
  • “deodamnatus” – dammit
  • “Irrumator” – Bastard
  • “Bovis stercus” – Bull sh*t
  • “Lupa” – Slut
  • “Leno” – Pimp

BASIC SAYINGS:

  • filius canis” – son of a b**ch (literally ‘son of a dog’)
  • “futuere” – get f**ked
  • “futue te ipsi” – f**k you
  • “ede faecam” – eat sh*t
  • “Flocci non faccio” – I don’t give a damn
  • “Stercus accidit” – Sh*t happens

SWEAR WORDS & INSULTS:

  • “Es stultior asino” – You are dumber than an a**
  • “Es scortum obscenus vilis” – You are a vile, perverted whore
  • “Te futueo et caballum tuum” – Screw you and the horse you rode in on
  • “Es mundus excrementi” – You are a pile of sh*t
  • “Es stercus!”  You sh*t!
  • “Moecha Putida” – Dirty slut
  • “Podex perfectus es” – You’re a complete a**hole
  • “Potes meos suaviari clunes” – You can kiss my a**.
  • “Futue te ipsum!” – Go f*ck yourself!
  • “Perite” – F*ck off!
  • “Vacca stulta” – You stupid cow
  • fututus et mori in igni” – f**k off and die in a fire
  • “Vescere bracis meis” – Eat my shorts
  • “Morologus es!” – You’re talking like a moron!
  • “Puto vos esse molestissimos” – I think that you are very annoying
  • “Qualem blennum!” – What a doofus!
  • “Qualem muleirculam!” – What a bimbo

Funny Insults:

Mater tua tam obesa est ut cum Romae est urbs habet octo colles!
Your mama is so fat when she goes to Rome it has 8 hills!