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Same same but (sounds) different – Part 3 Posted by on May 5, 2010 in Language

Hi everybody. Today there´s the third and last part of words that are the same in both languages. Finally we´ll see the letters R to Z.

There are not much left, although there are a lot of words that are not exactly but almost the same. But this is another story. As always, don´t forget that the pronunciation is different in most cases!

Here we go:

German

English

Radio

radio

Rest

rest

Ring

ring

Rose

rose

Rucksack

rucksack

Singer

singer

Ski

ski

Sofa

sofa

Spray

spray

Stress

stress

Talent

talent

Taxi

taxi

Team

team

Test

test

Text

text

Tiger

tiger

Toast

toast

Toilette

toilet

Trainer

trainer

Uniform

uniform

Vase

vase

Video

video

Volleyball

volleyball

warm

warm

Wind

wind

Winter

winter

Wolf

wolf

Zebra

zebra

Hi everybody. Today there´s the third and last part of words that are the same in both languages. Finally we´ll see the letters R to Z.

There are not much left, although there are a lot of words that are not exactly but almost the same. But this is another story. As always, don´t forget that the pronunciation is different in most cases!

Here we go:

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About the Author:jan

My name is Jan and I live in the south west of Germany. My profession is being a project manager at a company that creates digital media (first of all internet related things). This is my job since over a decade so I´m quite familiar with the web and its tools. Whereat today almost every school kid does. But that´s one of the main reasons why nowadays there are quasi no more limits in the internet and so it can be used for all imaginable types of things. For example learning languages! And that´s where we are at the moment. I first got in touch with Transparent Language when my family and I used to live in France a couple of years ago. I just had a break from work and by coincidence I produced some cultural videos in French. A few months later the whole blogging thing came up and I was lucky to be a part of it. So now my (second) job is to feed you with information, exercises, vocabulary, grammar and stories about Germany and German language. For being a passionate videographer I´m trying to do this more and more by videos. If you have any wishes or needs of topics that should be treated here, please don´t hesitate to contact me via a comment field. I´m open to your suggestions (as long as they are not too individual) and will try to satisfy your needs.


Comments:

  1. M.C.:

    Very helpful list, though I can’t say that I’ve seen or heard waldsterben in English. 🙂

  2. Neil Lucock:

    Waldsterben ought to mean “forest-death”, I’ve never encountered the word in British English (nor in the strange dialect that Americans speak) 🙂
    What does it mean?

  3. jan:

    well, to be honest, I don´t know either! You´re right, Waldsterben means forest death. When I made the research, I also thought that this is pretty strange. But you know, “Kindergarten” doesn´t sound English as well. So I thought, maybe it´s just a strange coincident lile Kindergarten and really right 😉

  4. moonchild silverlight:

    trainer—–english coach
    rucksack—-english backbag
    waldsterben —–english the forest dies…….
    ich hab noch nie waldsterben in englisch gehoert, das gibt es nicht.

  5. moonchild silverlight:

    tell me did you translate with babelfish????
    they translate words like this wrong.
    and you are right there is kindergarten in the englisch language, but is more like first grade in germany.

  6. jan:

    Hey Guys, thank you for your comments. I just deleted “Waldsterben” because this is obviously wrong! By the way, I didn´t translate with babelfish. I know that this is very buggy…

  7. Scheich Josef:

    The German word “Waldsterben” came up in
    in Germany around 1980 in discussions about
    the environment. The terms “waldsterben” and
    “le waldsterben” were then used as loanwords in political and ecological discussions in English, resp. French.

    You can see and hear the loanword “waldsterben”
    for example in Collins English Dictionary online:
    http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-definition/waldsterben
    and also in
    http://en.bab.la/dictionary/german-english/waldsterben
    or in
    http://www.dict.cc/german-english/Waldsterben.html

    Thus I don’t see anything wrong with the pair

    Waldsterben – waldsterben.

    With best wishes from Germany,

    Josef