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French Grammar: Back to the Future! Posted by on Jul 31, 2011 in Film, Grammar, Vocabulary

Mes chers amis (my dear friends), il est grand temps (it’s high time) that we get back to the future—And by that I mean the French grammatical futur 
Notice that unlike the English word “future“, its French equivalent is written without an “e.
The French future is un temps grammatical (a grammatical tense) that comes in four forms:
  • Le présent à valeur de futur (The Present with a Future value):
En mi-Août, mes vacances commencent” (“In mid August, my holidays begin”)
  • Le futur proche (The Near Future):
“Nous allons jouer un petit match de foot dans quelques minutes” (“We’re going to play a football game in a few minutes”)
  • Le futur simple (The Future Tense):
Je passerai te voir à Paris Plages demain” (“I’ll come see you at Paris Plages tomorrow”)
  • Le futur antérieur (The Future Perfect):
J’aurai fini le boulot avant ton réveil” (“I’ll be done with the job before you wake up”)


1. Le présent à valeur de futur (The Present with Future Value):

Sometimes the présent can come with a time hint, in order to express a fact that will occur prochainement (soon):

        • Par exemple: “Je te revois cette fin de semaine” (“I see you again this weekend”)

2. Le futur proche (The Near Future):

Its structure is built like this: ALLER” (In le présent) + l’infinitif 

The futur proche expresses either an action that is about to take place, or something that is sure to happen in the future:

The action of le futur simple takes place in a future that is either coming up soon or not so so soon. It fits planned actions, for example.

  • Quand je serai grand, je serai professeur de Français” (“When I’m older, I’ll become a French Professor.”)

4. Le futur antérieur (The Future Perfect):

The French Future Perfect, known as le futur antérieur, expresses precedence of an action with respect to a future action.
It is un temps composé, so it either goes with avoir ou être, set in the futur simple mode, like we just saw, followed by the participe passé of the verb.

      • “Je n’aurai l’esprit tanquille que quand j’aurai reglé tout ces problèmes(“I won’t have my mind in peace until I’d have solved all these problems.”)

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Comments:

  1. andreas:

    Salut, Hichem
    “J’aurais fini le boulot avant ton réveil” n’est-il pas le conditionnel passé?

    • Hichem:

      @andreas Salut Andreas, et merci de souligner cette erreur!

      Tu as parfaitement raison, Il faut l’ecrire sans “s”, puisqu’il s’agit en l’occurrence du futur anterieur 🙂

  2. Phanindra:

    I like the translations form French to English. I really like these things and I am enjoying well.

    Thanks for your word to word translations.

  3. nobby:

    ◦“Je n’aurai l’esprit tanquille que quand j’aurai reglé tout ces problèmes” (“I won’t have my mind in peace until I’d have solved all these problems.”)

    Erreur en la phrase.
    il est tranquille avec un “r”

    Nobby