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Book Recommendation Posted by on Aug 24, 2018 in Hindi Language

It is difficult कठिन (kathin) to gauge अनुमान लगाना (anumaan lagaana) traffic flow in India. With that in mind, on a recent हाल ही के (haal hi ke) trip सफ़र (safar) out of Hyderabad, I arrived at the airport with a fairly large amount of time before my onward flight.
As I looked through the bookstore किताबों की दुकान (kitabon ki dukaan) at the airport, “Everybody Loves a Good Drought” by P. Sainath caught my eye पर मेरी नज़र पडी (par meri nazar padi).
[P. Sainath द्वारा लिखित (dwaaraa likhit) “Everybody Loves a Good Drought” पर मेरी नज़र पडी ]**

Sainath is a Magsaysay Award winning journalist पत्रकार (patrakaar) who has been reporting for at least 25 years on rural poverty ग्रामीण गरीबी in India. Sainath’s work illustrates the circumstances, challenges, and factors that make rural poverty such a complex subject to cover and present.
The plight दुर्दशा (durdasha) of farmers किसान (kisaan) in India is no new news.

Farmer farming in Balasore, Odisha.
[By Ansuman [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons]

Droughts सूखा (sookha), devastated harvests, lost or no income, land-grabbing, … are just some of the hardships of those that work to feed us. For over a decade now, farmers who have given up hope in these battles, have been driven to suicide, and continue to do so. Reports indicate how the Indian government has been unsuccessful in support these citizens or enable respite.
Through years of visiting, revisiting, documenting and reporting, Sainath presents a deep and often disturbing glimpse of a little known side of India.
**In Hindi, written by translates to by written. द्वारा (dwaaraa) = by; लिखित (likhit) = written

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About the Author:Nitya

Namaste, friends. My name is Nitya. I was born and raised in Mumbai (formerly Bombay). I'm a native Hindi speaker. However, as life took me through school, college, work, and waves of friends from different parts of India, my repertoire of Hindi flavors and dialects grew and added dimension to my native fluency. Casual, formal, colloquial, and regional ... Hindi is a language with incredible variety and localization. Through this blog, I will help you learn Hindi through conversations, vocabulary, colloquialisms, and glimpses of Indian culture. आओ, मिलकर हिंदी सीखते हैं। (Aao, milkar Hindi seekhte hain!) Come, let's learn Hindi together.