LearnIrishwith Us!

Start Learning!

Irish Language Blog

Archive for June, 2009

Blianta Go Leor — Years Galore, Except the Donkey’s! Posted by on Jun 29, 2009

(le Róislín) You may have noticed Transparent’s recent Word of the Day, bliain (year) or an bhliain (the year).  Care to guess how many forms of this word are in common use? Well, there’s the lenited form (an bhliain), the special form used after the numbers 3, 4, 5, and 6 (bliana), the eclipsed “special”…

Continue reading

Tuilleadh Téarmaí Bia – More Food Terms in Irish Posted by on Jun 26, 2009

Here are a few of the traditional dishes, and a few not so traditional   Arán donn: brown bread.  An maith leat arán donn?  Do you like brown bread?   Arán sóide: soda bread.  An ndearna tú féin an t-arán sóide seo?  Tá sé an-bhlasta! Did you yourself make this soda bread.  It’s very tasty!…

Continue reading

A Práta by Any Other Name: Téarmaí Bia agus Cócaireachta (Food and Cooking Terms) Posted by on Jun 23, 2009

(le Róislín) What better place to begin a discussion of Irish cuisine than with the potato?  Still one of the príomhbhianna (staple foods) of Ireland, potatoes may be served in two or even three different ways in one béile (meal).  Typical styles of preparation would include: prátaí bruite or beirithe (boiled), prátaí friochta (fried), and…

Continue reading

Téarmaí Ginealeolaíochta: Genealogical Terms in Irish Posted by on Jun 20, 2009

Are you working ar do chraobh ghinealaigh (on your family tree)?  Are you interested i nginealeolaíocht (in genealogy)?  If so, these terms could be useful.  They are shown as vocabulary items and with sample phrases or questions.    ainm (name): Cén t-ainm atá ort?  What’s your name?    sloinne (surname): Cén sloinne atá ort?  What’s…

Continue reading

An Bhfuil Ceol Agat? An Seinneann Tú an tAltsacsafón … an Xileafón? Posted by on Jun 17, 2009

 (le Róislín) There are several ways to ask in Irish if someone plays music.  Probably the most general is “An bhfuil ceol agat?”  This literally means “Is there music at you” and refers to playing or singing.  The construction where an activity is “at you” is widely used to ask about skills or abilities.  Some more…

Continue reading

Older posts