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Archive for July, 2011

Logainmneacha le “an” agus Guta (a, e, i, o, u): An Afraic, An Aird Mhóir, srl. Posted by on Jul 30, 2011

(le Róislín) The last major segment of this logainmneacha series will deal with place names that have the definite article “an” and where the actual place names starts with a vowel.  So far, for a quick review, we’ve seen samplaí of the various other combinations, like: i (ins) + an + consan: An Ghearmáin, sa…

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Logainmneacha le “na”: Sna Bahámaí, Sna Forbacha, Sna Hamptons, srl. Posted by on Jul 28, 2011

(le Róislín) It may seem like a stretch when people tell you that the Irish preposition “i” becomes “sna” before certain nouns, including a small, but not insignificant, number of place names.  But it’s actually quite a logical step when you remember that “i” is another form of “ins,” both of which mean “in.” So…

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Cleachtadh le Logainmneacha ó Iowa go hUíbh Fhailí Posted by on Jul 25, 2011

(le Róislín) Before going further with more place name possibilities, let’s practice some more with the patterns we’ve already been working on.  Just as a review, some samples include a)      place names starting with a vowel and with no definite article (“i” becomes “in”): tíortha: in Éírinn, in Iamáice cathracha, bailte, stáit, contaetha, srl.: in…

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Logainmneacha a Thosaíonn le “An” (“the”) agus Consan (b, c, d, f, g, m, p, s, t) Posted by on Jul 22, 2011

(le Róislín) I’m sure geographers and all kinds of political, economic, and cultural analysts have all kinds of ways of categorizing countries, including by daonra, dlús daonra, cineál rialtais, leibhéal oideachais, olltáirgeacht intíre (OTI), stádas sna Náisiúin Aontaithe, srl. However, as you may have noted from the last couple of blogs, and the title of…

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Logainmneacha a Thosaíonn le Gutaí (a, e, i, o, u) agus “in” Posted by on Jul 19, 2011

(le Róislín) Our last blog dealt with places names like Ceanada and Cúba, which take “urú,” and additional place names like Meicsiceo or Sasana, which are not subject to “urú” because of the letters they happen to start with.  As you may recall, the “urú” examples work like this: Tá sé ina chónaí i gCeanada. …

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