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Tag Archives: arán

Irish Christmas Terms without the Word ‘Christmas’ — Quiz Yourself! Posted by on Dec 23, 2015

(le Róislín) One of the first Christmas blogs I wrote in this series was about Christmas phrases that don’t have the word “Christmas” in them (nasc thíos).  Every time we use the word Christmas in Irish (Nollaig, Nollag), we have to be aware of the ending (“-aig” or “-ag”) and whether or not to include…

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Dóigheanna le Prátaí a Réiteach (Irish Terms for Ways to Prepare Potatoes) Posted by on Nov 26, 2015

Potatoes may be popular all year around, but in the U.S., they are especially popular in late November, for Lá an Altaithe.  At this time, many American families will serve two or three types of potatoes with the Thanksgiving meal, and I’ve even heard of up to four types at one meal.  The two types…

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Oideas i nGaeilge: Arán Sóide Éireannach, agus Aistriúchán Béarla (and an English translation) Posted by on Dec 11, 2014

(le Róislín) Mí na Nollag!  Seo an séasúr le bheith ag bácáil.  Brioscaí, cístí, fíoracha sinséir, donnóga, agus araile.  Ach má tá tú ag iarraidh gan barraíocht rudaí milse a dhéanamh i mbliana, seo oideas d’arán blasta.  Níl siúcra ar bith ann, ar ndóigh, ach má tá tú ag iarraidh blas beagán milis, bain triail…

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What’s the “Tuiseal” of “an Tuiseal Ginideach” Anyway? Posted by on Apr 5, 2011

(le Róislín) By now, you’ve probably heard the term “tuiseal” quite a bit in discussing Irish nouns.  It’s generally translated as “case” as in “an tuiseal gairmeach” (“a Shinéad” for “Sinéad” in the “vocative” case) or as in “an tuiseal ginideach” (“cóta Sheáin” for “John’s coat” in the “genitive” case), etc. Of course, this isn’t…

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Logainmneacha Ceilteacha agus Náisiúntachtaí a hAon: Celtic Place Names and Nationalities – Scotland and the Scots Posted by on Apr 15, 2009

  We recently saw “Albain” (Scotland) as one of Transparent Language’s Word of the Day features.  This is based on the word “Alba,” which is what the Scots call their country in their own Celtic language, Gàidhlig.  Why not a word that sounds something like “Scotland” (like Italian “Scòzia” or French “Ecosse” or German “Schottland”)? …

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