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Your wish – our command! Posted by on May 13, 2010 in Swedish Language, The Swedish blog team

I admit, we have been a bit lazy when it comes to grammar and vocab lately. But before we dig deeper into the fascinating world of accusative cases,  the genitive, å-ä-ö, tongue twisters and sj-sounds, we would love some guidelines from you kära läsare (dear readers). Please let us know what confuses you the most about Swedish and what you never seem to get your head around and we’ll do vårt bästa (our best) to grant your grammar/vocab wishes. So please, just click on Post a comment and drop a quick line if there’s anything particular language wise you would want a post about. If not, well, feel free to tell us precis vad du vill (whatever you’d like).

Or, why not simply show off your Swedish skills? Can you find the 10 hidden Swedish adjectives in the puzzle beneath? And this time, I’ll be mean and not give you the 10 clue words until tomorrow!

H G F B R S T J S T I O M D K
N I I P I Y F K R O E D K A T
J X M R S T I U T R H Y S V E
V C K T G M T C G R L R L U V
A D U Z R N M E J R A Q I N I
G I H A P J U I R L Z Z P D K
Z M N X O X A H G L P S Y S B
V D Z I I B P R I V C F D J T
E I Y V H C E R L T G V S U H
G I D L Y K S O L X T W M K U
U V H I C O O L U P I N S A M
I N B A Y T P F G U U X C S H
U J V K G C A W S Q G C R Z U
Z Q M E I C O T M J D F R O O
F D B L K E D A S N O Q P A V

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Comments:

  1. Imran:

    I am unable to find the adjectives. But regarding your comment about difficulties in Swedish, I would like to say that I feel very difficult to understand indefinite and plural forms.

  2. Minty:

    Im at SFI now, and I think one of the hardest things to understand is the forms of words and when to use them. There is perfekt, substantiv, preteritum, supinum and indefinite forms. Have fun… 😛 It helps if you knwo english well, on understanding the reason the words have different forms, but when to use them can be different to english.

  3. Minty:

    I looked for words, found a lot I don’t think I was supposed to 😛

    SPOILER ALERT
    english words I found:
    cool, roo, cot, dim, poi, pose, gill, lug, slip, vet, hum, bitter, jar, stat, hag, skim, zig, soy, loot, beg, woe, tum

    Svenska ord jag hittade:
    sol, ris, hus, vag, vad, nu, vet, vik, hum, bitter, hitt, rov, vid, tyst, trut, kyl, grek, tum

    I know some of them aren’t adjectives! But I was heppy when i found them so I told you anyway 😛

  4. Ahmed:

    I have been learning swedish since i came and i am on my 7th weeks sjunda veckor and so far i dnt find hard to learn but i must have the dedication to do so inorder to progress well the difficulty is not finding vocabulary book in swedish there are some like vocabluren s and vocabluren 2 but the had negative feed back also vocabulary builder in swedish sold online too has not been great option.
    Secondly is talking dictionary that will read and pronaonce.
    pronounce in swedish again there are many online lexikon but unfortunately those ones don’t pronounce every thing you write in swedish they just pronounce the inventive of the word , verb , subject , adjective, and adverbs and so on we still need to know how words pronounce in swedish specially if you are a beginner.
    Thirdly, i need structured explanation on how to read the word in the dictionaries which is supported with Uttal for example word ram you will find it written like ( ra:m) i know what this refer too but there other symbols i can not understand them and are not explained clearly on my lexikon
    MVH,
    Alshehri

  5. Darlene:

    Jealous sick dry bitter vague beautiful cute hungry expensive and guilty? Very tough puzzle. Thanks!

  6. Kevin:

    Swedish prepositions are tricky for me, i.e. when to use pa, av, om, till. A breakdown of this would be greatly appreciated 🙂

  7. Minty:

    My SFI teachers say prepositions are one of the hardest things to learn, and they don’t really hve rules the way english ones do. I am pickign it up mostly from listening to when they are used, I think thats easiest! Or reading a book if you don’t have swedes to listen to 🙂

  8. B R Gustafson:

    Swedish Noun Declensions! If you could manage to explain those in a blog post or two, I’d promptly propose and whisk you off to a most romantic honeymoon.

  9. Nic:

    I study daily, speak with some friends, always speak Swedish in stores, banks, etc (even though I don’t always understand 100%… or even 80%).

    I’m happy with basics (and I have written a fairly cool (OK, so I’m biased) handout for Verbs and Nouns.

    But word order, bisats, prepositions are always hard. As are, and probably most importantly, general phrases. One can literally translate and one can be understood… but it will always be poor. So, what I would really love are the sorts of phrases that are simply different between English and Swedish.

    For example:

    E: You are right!
    S: Du har rätt!

    It’s a different verb… I should be able to think of more examples… but embarrassingly I can’t right now!

  10. Nic:

    P.S. I can share my handout if you’d like to take a look and OK it first!

  11. jennie:

    Cheers all for your great inputs and comments, this is really useful for us and we’ll try to grant all your grammar wishes.

    @Nic:Thank you, general phrases are a brilliant idea!