LearnGermanwith Us!

Start Learning!

German Language Blog

German grammar in use: The conjugation of the verb “gehen” Posted by on Aug 25, 2014 in Grammar, Language

The German verb gehen has got several English translations. First of all, it means to go, to walk, to leave, and to attend. But gehen is also used in German to say that something works or is feasible. Let’s have a closer look, which meanings gehen can have in the German tenses.

 

Präsens – Present tense

In the Präsens tense gehen can mean to go, to walk, to leave, to attend, to work (function), and to be feasible. Of course, you can use gehen in further compositions, such as “über die Straße gehen” (to cross the street).

 

  Singular Plural
1st person ich gehe wir gehen
2nd person du gehst – informal
Sie gehen – formal
ihr geht – informal
Sie gehen – formal
3rd person er/sie/es geht sie gehen

 

1. Der Fernseher geht nicht. Ist der Stecker drin? / Steckt der Stecker?
(The TV doesn’t work. Is the plug plugged in?)

2. Kerstin geht nicht mehr zur Schule. Sie ist schon 28 und hat einen Beruf.
(Kerstin doesn’t attend school anymore. She is already 28 and has got a job.)

3. Stefan und ich gehe heute Abend ins Kino. Willst du mitkommen?
(Stefan and I are going to the movies tonight. Do you want to join us?)

4. Bei Rot geht man nicht über die Straße.
(You don’t have to cross the street at red.)

 

Imperativ – Imperative

When giving commands gehen is used in the sense of to go, to walk, and to leave.

1. Sandra, gehe jetzt schlafen! Es ist schon spät und du musst morgen früh aufstehen.
(Talking to myself: Sandra, go to bed now! It’s already late and you have to get up early tomorrow morning.)

2. Geh jetzt bitte! Ich habe genug von deinen Ausreden.
(Please, go now! I’m tired of your excuses.)

3. Danke für den Ratschlag. Aber gehen Sie jetzt bitte und kümmern sich um Ihre eigenen Angelegenheiten.
(Thanks for your advice. But please, go now and mind your own business.)

4. Gehen wir! Die Party ist doch lahm.
(Let’s go now! This party is lame.)

 

Präteritum – Preterit (equals simple past)

The Präteritum tense is predominantly used in the 1st and 3rd person (both singular and plural) in everyday German. Germans usually do not form statements and questions with gehen in the 2nd person (neither singular nor plural) in the preterit tense. When it comes to talk about the past with gehen Germans are more likely to use the perfect tense.

Anyway, in the preterit tense gehen can be used in the sense of to go, to walk, to leave, to attend, to work and to be feasible.

 

Singular Plural
1st person ich ging wir gingen
2nd person du gingst – informal
Sie gingen – formal
ihr gingt – informal
Sie gingen – formal
3rd person er/sie/es ging sie gingen

 

1. Nach dem Unwetter ging das Licht nicht mehr.
(The light didn’t work after the storm)

2. Wir gingen auf dieselbe Schule. Aber seit dem Abschluss haben wir keinen Kontakt mehr.
(We attended the same school. But we haven’t been in contact since our graduation.)

3. Unser Plan ging völlig in die Hose.
(Our plan went down the drain.)

4. Früher ging sie jeden Morgen zum Bäcker, um frisches Brot zu kaufen. Doch seitdem sie einen Brotbackautomaten hat, bäckt sie ihr Brot selbst.
(She used to go to the bakery every morning to buy fresh bread. But since she has got her own bread maker she makes her own bread.)

 

Futur I – Future I

In the Futur I tense gehen can have all the meanings I have already mentioned. But as you can see in sentence 1 the meaning of gehen can be modified in a particular composition. When Germans say that they go to another country it means that they intend to live there forever or, at least, for a while. When you want to express that Switzerland is your vacation destination you should use the verb fahren (to drive): “Nächstes Jahr fahren wir in die Schweiz”, which means that you are travelling to Switzerland next year.

 

Singular Plural
1st person ich werde gehen wir werden gehen
2nd person du wirst gehen – informal
Sie werden gehen – formal
ihr werdet gehen – informal
Sie werden gehen – formal
3rd person er/sie/es wird gehen sie werden gehen

 

1. Wir werden nächstes Jahr in die Schweiz gehen.
(We will move to Switzerland next year.)

2. Michael wird bald in die Schule gehen.
(Michael will soon attend school.)

3. An meinem Geburstag werden wir ins Kino gehen.
(We will go to the movies on my birthday.)

4. Wirst du mit mir wandern gehen, wenn wir im Urlaub sind?
(Will you go trekking with me when we are on holidays?)

5. Das wird nicht gehen.
(It won’t work/be feasible.)

 

Perfekt – Perfect

In my opinion, the Perfekt is the favorite tense of Germans when it comes to talk about the past. You simply need to know the past participle form of a particular verb and the conjugation of the auxiliaries sein (to be) or haben (to have).

 

Singular Plural
1st person ich bin gegangen wir sind gegangen
2nd person du bist gegangen – informal
Sie sind gegangen – formal
ihr seid gegangen – informal
Sie sind gegangen – formal
3rd person er/sie/es ist gegangen sie sind gegangen

 

1. Im Kino lief kein guter Film. Also sind wir ins Theater gegangen.
(They didn’t screen a good film at the movies. So we went to the theater.)

2. Ich bin dreimal um den Block gegangen, um unsere Katze zu suchen. Leider habe ich sie nicht gefunden.
(I walked around the block three times to look for our cat. Unfortunately, I haven’t found it.)

3. Es war Grün als wir über die Straße gegangen sind.
(The traffic lights were green when we crossed the street.)

4. Seid ihr gestern am Ufer entlang gegangen?
(Did you walk along the riverside yesterday?)

 

Plusquamperfekt – Pluperfect (equals past perfect)

When you would like to talk about the pluperfect then you have to use the Plusquamperfekt in German. Forming it is as simple as the Perfekt. All you need to know is the past participle of a verb and the conjugation of the auxiliary war (was) or hatten (had).

Basically, all meanings of gehen, which I have already mentioned, are possible in the pluperfect. However, I prefer the meanings to go, to walk, to leave, and also to attend. Using gehen in the sense of to work/function and to be feasible in the Plusquamperfekt sounds odd to me.

 

Singular Plural
1st person ich war gegangen wir waren gegangen
2nd person du warst gegangen – informal
Sie waren gegangen – formal
ihr wart gegangen – informal
Sie waren gegangen – formal
3rd person er/sie/es war gegangen sie waren gegangen

 

1. Ihr wart schon gegangen als der Unfall passierte.
(You were already gone when the accident happened.)

 

Futur II – future II

I would use gehen in the Futur II tense only in the sense of to go, to walk, to leave, and to attend. The meanings to work/function and to be feasible appear unnatural to me.

 

Singular Plural
1st person ich werde gegangen sein wir werden gegangen sein
2nd person du wirst gegangen sein – informal
Sie werden gegangen sein – formal
ihr werdet gegangen sein – informal
Sie werden gegangen sein – formal
3rd person er/sie/es wird gegangen sein sie werden gegangen sein

 

1. Wenn du morgen früh aufstehst, werde ich bereits zum Briefkasten gegangen sein und die Zeitung geholt haben.
(When you get up tomorrow morning I will already have gone to the postbox and got the paper.)

Tags: , , ,
Share this:
Pin it

About the Author:Sandra Rösner

Hello everybody! I studied English and American Studies, Communication Science, and Political Science at the University of Greifswald. Since I have been learning English as a second language myself for almost 20 years now I know how difficult it is to learn a language other than your native one. Thus, I am always willing to keep my explanations about German grammar comprehensible and short. Further, I am inclined to encourage you to speak German in every situation. Regards, Sandra