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Six Reasons To Learn German Posted by on Oct 5, 2017

If you’re reading this blog post, it’s safe to assume you’re either a) already learning German, or b) thinking about it. Maybe you have a specific reason to learn German (family, work, etc.) or you’re interested in language learning in general, and are considering German as the language you want to learn. Whatever your reason…

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Denglish Pseudo-Anglicisms Posted by on Mar 23, 2015

Last time I posted about the ever-growing use of Denglish (or Denglisch, depending on whether you’re speaking German or English) on social media & websites. Since that post, by the way, I’ve been keeping an eye out for more Denglish on social media. Here’s an interesting one I saw recently: Danke für’s featuren! – Thanks…

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Meinem, deinem, ihrem, unserem, etc.: German possessive pronouns in the dative case Posted by on Jan 21, 2013

In two of my previous post, I have already written about possessive pronouns in the nominative case and possessive pronouns in the genitive case. Now, I would like to continue with the third case or dative case. In general, the dative case shows possession. That is, when you want to use a possessive pronoun in…

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German adjectives, part 2 – The weak declension Posted by on Jun 22, 2012

In my last post I began to talk about forming simple sentences with adjectives in German. You learned that there is no need to decline adjectives in so-called “to be” sentences or, in other words, when you put the adjective after the noun. Unfortunately, things are getting more complicated when you want to put the…

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Compound words: Das Fugen-s im Deutschen – The linking “s” in German, part 2 Posted by on Feb 24, 2012

The German language is very productive in compounding words. It is virtually possible to great a never-ending word. Of course, Germans do not carry word compounding to extremes, that is, compound words of everyday language do never consist of more than two or three separate words.   Anyway, this characteristic of the German language can…

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