Menu
Search

Recipes For Three Festive German Hot Drinks Posted by on Dec 29, 2020 in Food, Holidays, vocabulary

As promised in my last post (which you can find here), I will be sharing with you how to make these delicious winter warmers. You can often buy these ready made in the supermarket, but I find it tastes even better using real spices. I have added a vocabulary list at the end of the post to help you understand these German recipes.

 

Glühwein – Mulled Wine

Zutaten:

1 Liter Rotwein

2 Bio Orangen, in Scheiben geschnitten

1 Bio Zitrone, in Scheiben geschnitten

8 Nelken

2 Zimtstangen

1 Sternanis

50g Zucker

50ml Rum (optional)

Methode:

Den Rotwein, die Gewürze, Zucker und die Orangen und Zitronenscheiben in einen Topf geben und bei niedriger Stufe erhitzen. Achtung: nicht kochen lassen! Den Rum am Ende dazugeben und nochmal rühren. Den Glühwein durch ein Sieb gießen und in Tassen servieren.

Kinderpunsch – Children’s Punch

Zutaten:

1 Liter Wasser

4 Beutel Früchtetee

500ml Apfelsaft

2 Bio Orangen, in Scheiben geschnitten

1 Bio Zitrone, in Scheiben geschnitten

8 Nelken

2 Zimtstangen

1 Sternanis

50g Zucker

Methode:

Einen Liter Wasser aufkochen lassen und die vier Beutel Früchtetee für 10 Minuten darin ziehen lassen. Die Apfelsaft, Orangen und Zitronenscheiben, die Gewürze und Zucker dazugeben und für 15 Minuten unter schwache Hitze ziehen lassen. Den Kinderpunsch durch ein Sieb gießen und in Tassen servieren.

 

Feuerzangenbowle – Fire Punch

Zutaten:

1 Liter Rotwein

2 Bio Orangen, in Scheiben geschnitten

1 Bio Zitrone, in Scheiben geschnitten

8 Nelken

2 Zimtstangen

1 Sternanis

350ml Rum

1 Zuckerhut

1 Zuckerzange

Methode:

Den Rotwein, die Gewürze und die Orangen und Zitronenscheiben in einen Topf geben und bei niedriger Stufe erhitzen. Achtung: nicht kochen lassen! Den Zuckerhut mit einer Zuckerzange über den Topf legen und mit Rum tränken. Den Zuckerhut anzünden und warten bis der Zucker vollständig in den Wein getropft ist. Die Feuerzangenbowle durch ein Sieb gießen und in Tassen servieren.

 

Here is a vocabulary list to help you understand these recipes:

der Rotwein                                            the red wine

die Orangenscheibe(n)                      the orange slice(s)

die Zitronenscheibe(n)                      the lemon slice(s)

die Nelke(n)                                            the clove(s)

die Zimtstange(n)                                the cinnamon stick(s)

der Sternanis                                         the star anise

der Rum                                                   the rum

der Zuckerhut                                       the sugar pyramid

die Zuckerzange                                  the sugar tongs

der Topf                                                   the pot

das Sieb                                                   the sieve

kochen                                                     to boil

tränken                                                    to soak

anzünden                                                to light/set fire to

 

Let me know in the comments below how you got on trying out these recipes, I personally will be making the Feuerzangenbowle on New Years Eve. If you didn’t understand something then feel free to ask me in the comment section too!

 

Thank you for reading,

Larissa

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Keep learning German with us!

Build vocabulary, practice pronunciation, and more with Transparent Language Online. Available anytime, anywhere, on any device.

Try it Free Find it at your Library
Share this:
Pin it

About the Author: Larissa

Hello I'm Larissa. I live in Germany and I am half German and half English. I love sharing my passion for Germany with you through my posts! Apart from writing posts I teach fitness classes in Munich.


Comments:

  1. Maggie McCloskey:

    Love your blogs. One tip: omit “the” in your word definitions. Don’t use in English. Just type “sugar” or “cloves” or whatever. Omit the word “the.” 🙂 I know you need it in German, but you don’t in English. Take care. 🙂

    • Larissa:

      @Maggie McCloskey Hi Maggie,

      I’m so glad you like the blog!
      As this is a blog directed for people learning languages I like to translate each word to make it clear for my readers, the translation to “der/die/das” is “the”, which is why I include it to my vocabulary lists.

      Thank you for reading,
      Larissa


Leave a comment: