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How to say I love you in Hindi Posted by on Feb 14, 2015 in Hindi Language

Valentine day is here and you might be wondering today on how to express your love to your beloved in Hindi.

Interesting question, how a native Hindi speaker express “I love you” in Hindi? Do I need to take care of gender? What could be the variations? situations?

Let me show you, how we say I love you in Hindi. 🙂 I have separated the expressions for male and female for easy reference plus I have provided some important note. If you want to say “much” or “very much” like “I love you very much”, just add a prefix “बहुत” (bahut) before “प्यार” (pyaar) in the sentences. You can take print out of this post, it can help you latter. 🙂

1. Love/Romantic relationship – Male to Female (Hetrosexual) / Male to Male (Homosexual)

मैं तुमसे प्यार करता हूँ।
Main tum se pyaar karta hoon.

मुझे तुम से प्यार है।
Mujhe tum se pyar hai.

मैं तुम को प्यार करता हूँ।
Main tum ko pyaar karta hoon.

मैं तुम्हे प्यार करता हूँ।
Main tumhe pyaar karta hoon.

Note : The above mentioned 4 expressions are those we use quite normally. These expressions are for two persons when they know each other and have close understanding.

मैं तुझे प्यार करता हूँ।
Main tujhe pyaar karta hoon.

Note: “तुझे” (tujhe – to you) shows that the you/the person is closer to you in your/ her thoughts. Because “तुझे” (tujhe) comes in between “tum” (less formal) and “tu” (informal) for “you” in Hindi. “Tu” shows less respect but at the same time more closeness in relationship.

मैं आप से प्यार करता हूँ।
Main aap se prem karta hoon.

Note: “आप” (Aap) shows that the you/the person is still at distance to you in your/ her thoughts or understanding. Because “आप” (Aap) is formal but sometime an indicator of more respect in the relationship.

मैं तुम से प्रेम करता हूँ।
Main tum se prem karta hoon.

Note : “प्रेम” (Prem) could be heard as well. This word is less common in usage (because it is from pure Hindi) but could be found in Hindi literature and from the mouth of a Hindi Scholar. 🙂

Female

1. Love/Romantic relationship – Female to Male (Hetrosexual) / Female to Female (Homosexual)

मैं तुमसे प्यार करती हूँ।
Main tum se pyaar karti hoon.

मुझे तुम से प्यार है।
Mujhe tum se pyar hai.

मैं तुम को प्यार करती हूँ।
Main tum ko pyaar karti hoon.

मैं तुम्हे प्यार करती हूँ।
Main tumhe pyaar karti hoon.

Note : The above mentioned 4 expressions are those we use quite normally. These expressions are for two persons when they know each other and have close understanding.

मैं तुझे प्यार करती हूँ।
Main tujhe pyaar karti hoon.

Note : “तुझे” (tujhe – to you) shows that the you/the person is closer to you in your/ her thoughts. Because तुझे (tujhe) comes inbetween tum (less formal) and tu (informal). “Tu” shows less respect but at the same time more closeness in relationship.

मैं आप से प्यार करती हूँ।
Main aap se prem karti hoon.

Note: “आप” (Aap) shows that the you/the person is still at distance to you in your/ her thoughts or understanding. Because आप (Aap) is very formal but sometime an indicator of more respect in the relationship.

मैं तुम से प्रेम करती हूँ।
Main tum se prem karti hoon.

Note : “प्रेम” (Prem) could be heard as well. This word is less common in usage but could be found in Hindi literature and from the mouth of a Hindi Scholar. 🙂

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About the Author:Nitin Kumar

Nitin Kumar is a native Hindi speaker from New Delhi, India. His education qualification include Masters in Robotics and Bachelors in Mechanical Engineering. Currently, he is working in the Research and Development in Robotics in Germany. He is avid language learner with varied level of proficiency in English, German, Spanish, and Japanese. He wish to learn French one day. His passion for languages motivated him to share his mother tongue, Hindi, and culture and traditions associated with its speakers. He has been working with Transparent Language since 2010 and has written over 430 blogs on various topics on Hindi language and India, its culture and traditions. He is also the Administrator for Hindi Facebook page which has a community of over 330,000 members.


Comments:

  1. Shawn:

    Thanks!

    2 questions:

    In the 4 regular expressions are there any situations where one would be better to use than the other or are all 4 just as good and just depends how you want to express it?

    You say “prem” is pure Hindi, so does that make “pyaar” a borrowed Urdu word or is that still Hindi? I’ve also heard “ishq” used which I know is a borrowed word from Urdu. Does ishq and pyaar mean the same or is there a case where ishq fits better?

    • Nitin Kumar:

      @Shawn Namaste Shawn,

      No, you can use any of 4 expression. There isn’t any difference.

      Pyaar is a Hindi word, it is not borrowed from any language. It is derived from Sanskrit word “Priya”. Pyaar is a derived word from Sanskrit and Prem is a Sanskrit word used in Hindi, hence the reference of pure Hindi (first are Sanskrit words, then derived words from Sanskrit and then foreign or borrowed words). In literature or formal setting, Prem is used more often.

      Ishq is Arabic word and used in Urdu. It is rarely used in India, but I can imagine its occasional usage in Muslim community because of their proficiency in Arabic. It could be occasionally heard in Bollywood movies too.

      Hope this help!

  2. asang:

    I love you husband

  3. hindi hater:

    Although my mother tongue is Hindi, I am convinced that HINDI is amongst the most illogical languages. English should be our National Language.
    Each and every verb in Hindi is contradictory and idiotic.
    Khana = Kha + Na = Don’t Eat
    Sona = So + Na = Don’t Sleep
    Nahana = Naha + Na = Don’t Bathe
    & the list is endless.
    Each word is negating itself. This is complete nonsense and I hate Hindi

    • Nitin Kumar:

      @hindi hater @hindi hater: Because you have no idea how grammar work, that’s why you are comparing one thing to another. One is Verb Infinitive (Sona, Khaana, Peena etc) and another is Verb Root (So, kha, Pee etc). Learn the grammar and you’ll love this beautiful language.

  4. hindi hater:

    Hi Nitin,

    You are perhaps an expert in Hindi. However, for a layman/ordinary person, this is what it is. Infinitive & Root may be the technical justification but on the face value – Khana = Kha +Na = Don’t Eat ,Sona = So + Na = Don’t Sleep,
    Nahana = Naha + Na = Don’t Bathe. Why is “Na” added to each verb? Why can’t “ha” be added instead. There should be some logic. The argument about Root & Infinitive defies all logic. If that’s the case, why doesn’t English have this??

    • Nitin Kumar:

      @hindi hater It is because of your ignorance or misunderstanding only, even an illiterate person whose mother tongue is Hindi knows the difference between Khana (food), khana (verb) and kha na. The “na” is never written together with root of the verb (Kha). First, “na” is not a word in Hindi, it is negation, and second it comes to the end of the sentence as per grammar and not with root of word like you are presenting it. It is used like this “tu khana kha le na”. If you want to twist the grammar, construct some wrong sentences, try to find some sense in it and then blame the language for your mistakes then nobody can argue with you logically.

      And when it comes to English, there are much more confusion in English than Hindi. You have “put” with sound of “u” but “cut” has sound of “a” and with most of the words you can’t tell if it would be pronounced with a or u or e. In Hindi, you speak what what is the written. And even in another languages, like German and Spanish you speak what is written. Therefore, English has much more illogical in my opinion and it reason that most of the Indians who want to learn it get confused and give up.

  5. hindi hater:

    For that matter, can u name any other language which follows this illogical format?
    The verb is an action word – regardless of the form, it should define an action, in all languages. However, In Hindi it negates the action!!!!!Stupid

  6. hindi hater:

    Another one of the innumerable Illogical examples of HINDI – aa jao – one is being summoned and at the same time he is being told to leave!!!!
    Which place or country or ethnicity is HINDI used apart from India ? ( India too does NOT comply completely in terms of HINDI being used universally) can you please name any civilised community in our Solar System where a person knowing ONLY Hindi can communicate effectively?? On the other hand if one knows English, he can survive. One can earn a livelihood if he is good in English whereas there are innumerable experts in HINDI who are existing in oblivion.

  7. Neela:

    How I say “I love you” to my mother?