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Podcast #38 – Business Idioms Posted by on Jan 18, 2010 in Negócios

[audio:https://blogs.transparent.com/ingles/files/2010/01/negocios_2010_01_03-mp3.mp3]

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Let’s learn five very interesting and useful idioms that are used in business talk.

The first idiom is to work down to the wire. This means that you work until the last minute, or just before the deadline. Here’s an example:

I have this huge project to deliver in 2 days and I’m not even halfway through it yet. I will need to work down to the wire to get things done.

Our next idiom is to step up to the plate. This expression means that you take action or do your best to do something. It comes from baseball where players step up to the plate (a plastic mat on the ground) when it’s their turn to hit the ball. Example:

We need someone to step up to the plate and take care of the new community center project. Anyone?

The third idiom is to rally the troops. This expression comes from the military service and it means to basically motivate others at work, get them excited about a new project or to boost their morale. Example:

After all the lay-offs the company rallied its troops to start planning for the coming year.

Our fourth expression is to put a stake in the ground, which means to make an initial move to do something or to take the first step and make a commitment to do something. Here’s an example:

After being in New York for 5 years, they put a stake in the ground and decided to open an office in Los Angeles.

Last but not least, our fifth expression is to plug a product. Plugging a product means to promote it or talk positively about it. Listen to an example:

Credit cards companies hire highly paid professionals to plug their products. And that’s why their campaigns are so successful.

Well, this is it for today. See you next time!

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Comments:

  1. David Stephensen:

    Na Austrália tem algumas diferenças:

    To step up to the mark (not the plate)

    To draw a line in the sand (not put a stake in the ground)