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Archive for January, 2010

Clásail Choibhneasta Neamhdhíreacha san Aimsir Fháistineach: Indirect Relative Clauses in the Future Tense Posted by on Jan 30, 2010

Now that we’ve seen the indirect relative clauses in the present and past tenses, let’s look at similar sentences in the future tense.    As previously, we’ll look further at the verb “to be” and also a couple of regular verbs.  Eventually we’ll be working our way through the other ten irregular verbs Irish has…

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Clásail Choibhneasta Neamhdhíreacha san Aimsir Chaite: Indirect Relative Clauses in the Past Tense Posted by on Jan 28, 2010

Now that we’ve seen the indirect relative clauses in the present tense, let’s look at similar sentences in the past tense.    If that sounds like a bolgam mór gramadaí, you’re right.  But I think it’s the only way to really get to the heart of the matter regarding relative clauses.  Today, we’ll look further…

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Clásail Choibhneasta Neamhdhíreacha: Indirect Relative Clauses Posted by on Jan 26, 2010

This is probably the arena where most of the confusion with clásail choibhneasta starts to set in.  Remember how the “tá” form of the verb “to be” changes drastically (to “bhfuil”) for the question form?  You’ve probably seen this if you’ve done day one of almost any Irish language course.  Here’s an example, just for…

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Clásail Choibhneasta: Relative Clauses (Bratach Dhearg! Gramadach Os Do Chomhair Amach!) Posted by on Jan 23, 2010

Iarradh orm níos mó a scríobh faoi chlásail choibhneasta [KHLAWS-il KHIV-nas-tuh].  Seo beagán eolais fúthu—ar ndóigh is féidir i bhfad níos mó a scríobh ar an ábhar.  I was asked to write more about relative clauses.  Here’s the tip of the iceberg—and this is just for starters.    Tá dhá chineál acu ann, díreach agus…

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Frásaí Eile leis an bhFocal “Lochlannach” Posted by on Jan 20, 2010

(le Róislín) Recently we discussed various usages of the word “Lochlannach,” which can be translated in various ways, including “Scandinavian” and “Norse” (naisc thíos).  It’s used for Norway Spruce (sprús Lochlannach) and for Swedish goosefoot (blonagán Lochlannach).  I promised at least one more example, tastily potable, if it can be found to exist!  That was…

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