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Irish Language Blog

Archive for May, 2014

Agus Muid sna Fritíortha (While We’re in the Antipodes) Posted by on May 31, 2014

(le Róislín) Cíobhaí (an t-éan) (nasc ag bun an leathanaigh)    While we’re on an antipodal tear (naisc thíos), we might as well look at An Nua-Shéalainn also.  As with An Astráil, first the place name itself, then a few ki-words (úúps – deacair sin a sheachaint!). So, first, the country name.  Before we look…

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Beagán Eile de Bhéarla na hAstráile (A Little More Aussie English, translated into Irish) Posted by on May 28, 2014

(le Róislín) Given our recent “turas focal go dtí an Astráil,” I thought it would be interesting to add a few more basics, going beyond just the “-ie” ending ones we just looked at, like “barbie” and “tallie” (nasc thíos).  These will include the word “Australia” itself and the Irish versions of some iconic Aussie…

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Cuir Gaeilge ar Fhocail ‘Strine’ (Focail Astrálacha mar ‘brumby,’ srl.) Posted by on May 25, 2014

(le Róislín) In the last blog, we looked at the Irish word “beárbaiciú” and the various English versions (barbecue, barbeque, bar-b-q, BBQ, and the Australian “barbie”). So I thought it would be a fun challenge to look at some representative Australian English words and see what they would be in Irish.  Some of them will…

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Ón Teanga Taíno go Gaeilge (‘barabicu’ go ‘beárbaiciú’) Posted by on May 22, 2014

(le Róislín) In the last blog, we referred to “séasúr na mbeárbaiciúnna” (barbecue season) while discussing the Irish word “citseap” (from the Chinese ‘kôe-chiap’ or its Malay variation).  This blog will look more closely at the word “beárbaiciú” itself, which, clearly enough, means “barbecue.”  Or should that be “barbeque”?  Or “bar-b-q”?   Or BBQ?  Or, “the…

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Cén Focal Gaeilge a Thagann ón tSínis? (Leid: Itear ar Bhrocairí Teo é) Posted by on May 18, 2014

(le Róislín)  Cén focal Gaeilge a thagann ón tSínis?  Bhuel, OK, English is a significant intermediary, but it is interesting to consider how certain words have become gaelicized.   Especially if they start out as something like “ kôe-chiap ” or “ kê-chiap ” (literally, brine of pickled fish). As you may have guessed from looking at those…

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