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Crime in Poland, how safe is Poland? Posted by on Oct 14, 2018 in Countries, Crime, Phrases

Generally, Poland is a safe country for tourists, although some areas are best to avoid or needed to be vigilant during the stay.

While Poland generally has a low rate of violent crime, the incidence of street crime, which sometimes involves violence, is moderate. Major cities have higher rates of crime against residents and foreign visitors than other areas. Organized groups of thieves and pick-pockets operate at major tourist destinations, in train stations, and on trains, trams, and buses in major cities. Thieves often target overnight trains. Most pick-pocketing on trains occurs while boarding or disembarking. In a common scenario, a group of well-dressed young men surround you in the narrow aisle of the train, jostling and pick-pocketing you as they supposedly attempt to get around you. You should guard your passport, money, credit cards, and cell phone.

Polish bars and dance clubs are generally safe for the vast majority of visitors. However, as in many cities, people may approach you with offers of illicit drugs, which are against the law in Poland. Be mindful that security personnel at nightclubs could respond more forcefully than at similar venues in the United States. Whereas casinos and gaming establishments are government-regulated, some are affiliated with, or have attracted the interest of, organized crime.

kidnapping – porwanie

kidnapper – porywacz

kidnap – porywać

murder – morderstwo

murderer – morderca

robbery – napad

robber – napastnik

burglary – włamanie

burglar – włamywacz

shoplifting – kradzież

shoplifter – złodziej

forgery – fałszerstwo

forger – fałszerz

vandalism – wandalizm

vandal – wandal

vandalize – niszczyć/demolować

theft – kradzież

thief – złodziej

steal – kradzież

rape – gwałt

rapist – gwałciciel

witness – świadek

sentence – wyrok

trial – proces

arrest – areszt

judge – sędzia

ransom – okup

reward – nagroda

suspect – podejrzany

fraud – oszustwo

offense – wykroczenie

the death penalty – kara śmierci

community service – praca społeczna 

fine – grzywna/mandat

voice recognition – identyfikacja głosowa

to commit a crime – popełnić przestępstwo

handcuffs – kajdanki

emergency number – numer alarmowy

investigation – śledztwo

interrogation – przesłuchanie

lawyer – prawnik

judge – sędzia

attorney – adwokat

jury – ława przysięgłych

innocent – niewinny

guilty – winny

Stay safe!

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About the Author: Kasia

My name is Kasia Scontsas. I grew up in Lublin, Poland and moved to Warsaw to study International Business. I have passion for languages: any languages! Currently I live in New Hampshire. I enjoy skiing, kayaking, biking and paddle boarding. My husband speaks a little Polish, but our daughters are fluent in it! I wanted to make sure that they can communicate with their Polish relatives in our native language. Teaching them Polish since they were born was the best thing I could have given them! I have been writing about learning Polish language and culture for Transparent Language’s Polish Blog since 2010.


Comments:

  1. jolanta:

    My parents are Polish & always spoke Polish to us while we were young..They are now in their late 90’s & we still speak Polish…I am very greatful for that, considering I have lived in the U.S. majority of my life.
    When I had my children, I spoke only Polish to them, but once they turned school age & were forced to speak English, they did not want to speak Polish no matter how hard I tried…they would not speak to me unless it was English. The two of them regret it today very much & said they wish I would have never given up. So parents with little ones if you speak Polish or any other foreign language keep it up & dont give up. Kasia you gave your children the best gift ever!
    Jolanta

  2. Walt:

    Teaching them Polish is one of the best gifts you can give them

  3. Jean Koroway:

    Re: 100 years of Poland’s Independence on Nov 11th:

    How independent was Poland during the Soviet era?