LearnRussianwith Us!

Start Learning

Russian Language Blog

Dramatic poetry reading: «Багаж» (“Luggage”) Posted by on Aug 29, 2012 in Culture, language, Literature, Reading Together, Russian humor

I’ve been wanting for a while to make a video for the blog, but it took me a while to get over my camera-shyness — not to mention, fix some technical problems with my camcorder and figure out how to (sorta) use video-editing software.

As my debut ролик (“video clip”) for the blog, I decided to take a stab at a famous children’s poem: Багаж (“baggage; luggage”) by Самуил Яковлевич Маршак (S.Y. Marshak), first published circa 1926.

 

The humorous plot is straightforward enough: a дама (“genteel lady”) decides to take a train trip — her destination is the Ukrainian city of Житомир, and since the town of Дно is along the route, we can assume that she probably started from Ленинград:

 

Anyway, she checks in seven items of luggage, one of which is a very small pet dog. But the little poochy manages to escape during the trip, and the railway employees attempt to pull a fast one by substituting a huge, shaggy, stray mutt. So without further ado, here’s me reciting Багаж:

And here’s the complete text in Russian to help you follow along. If you read my post on Monday about verbs derived from давать/дать (“to give”), that’ll give you some help, and I’ve also included translations for some of the more colloquial vocabulary that you may not know — hover over the yellow-highlighted terms.

Дама сдавала в багаж:
Диван,
Чемодан,
Саквояж,
Картину,
Корзину,
Картонку
И маленькую собачонку.

Выдали даме на станции
Четыре зелёных квитанции
О том, что получен багаж:
Диван,
Чемодан,
Саквояж,
Картина,
Корзина,
Картонка
И маленькая собачонка.

Вещи везут на перрон.
Кидают в открытый вагон.
Готово. Уложен багаж:
Диван,
Чемодан,
Саквояж,
Картина,
Корзина,
Картонка
И маленькая собачонка.

Но только раздался звонок,
Удрал из вагона щенок.
Хватились на станции Дно:
Потеряно место одно.
В испуге считают багаж:
Диван,
Чемодан,
Саквояж,
Картина,
Корзина,
Картонка…
— «Товарищи!
Где собачонка?»

Вдруг видят: стоит у колёс
Огромный взъерошенный пёс.
Поймали его – и в багаж,
Туда, где лежал саквояж,
Картина,
Корзина,
Картонка,
Где прежде была собачонка.

Приехали в город Житомир.
Носильщик пятнадцатый номер
Везёт на тележке багаж:
Диван,
Чемодан,
Саквояж,
Картину,
Корзину,
Картонку,
А сзади ведут… “собачонку.”

Собака-то как зарычит.
А барыня как закричит:
— «Разбойники! Воры! Уроды!
Собака — не той породы

Швырнула она чемодан,
Ногой отпихнула диван,
Картину,
Корзину,
Картонку…
— «Отдайте мою собачонку!»

— «Позвольте, мамаша! На станции,
Согласно багажной квитанции,
От вас получили багаж:
Диван,
Чемодан,
Саквояж,
Картину,
Корзину,
Картонку
И маленькую собачонку.
Однако
За время пути
Собака
Могла подрасти

* * *

A few more comments about the vocabulary: The word барыня also, historically, referred to an aristocratic lady — more specifically, the wife of a барин, an affluent gentleman who belonged to “the nobility” and/or “the landed gentry.”

And let’s take a closer look at the lady’s hysterical cry of «Разбойники! Воры! Уроды!» The word разбойник specifically means “armed robber” or “highway bandit” — i.e., someone who threatens Жизнь или кошелёк, “Your wallet or your life!”. But вор means “thief” in a much more general sense that covers non-violent pickpockets and shoplifters. And урод, at least originally, referred to someone with a severe physical deformity — cf. Tod Browning’s Freaks or David Lynch’s The Elephant Man. But nowadays, урод may mean, depending on context: (A) a medically normal person who’s simply ugly; or (B) a person who might be good-looking but has an off-putting “weirdo” personality; or (C) a “creepy scumbag loser,” which is what the дама intends!

And she follows this with «Собака — не той породы!» (“the dog is the wrong breed”). What you should note here is the use of не + the demonstrative pronoun тот — very literally translatable as “not that one,” but it expresses the idea of “the wrong one” Similarly, не туда (lit., “not to there”) is “to the wrong place,” не тогда (lit., “not at that time”) is “at the wrong time,” and не там is “in the wrong place.” For example, one way to say “You’ve reached the wrong number” to someone on the phone is Вы не туда попали — literally, “You’ve ended up not-there.”

Tags: , , , , , ,
Share this:
Pin it

Comments:

  1. PTI:

    Роб,
    Молодец!

  2. Renata:

    Браво!

  3. Stas:

    Очень смело… Респект!..