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Archive for August, 2014

Uibheacha Friochta and other ‘egg’ terms in Irish Posted by on Aug 30, 2014

(le Róislín) Last blog we talked about “ispíní” and other breakfast foods, including some brief references to “uibheacha friochta,” “uibheacha scrofa,” “uibheacha scallta,” and “uibheacha bogbhruite.” Let’s take a look at a few more terms referring to eggs, ways to cook them, types of eggs, and maybe a seanfhocal or two.  Can you think of…

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Speaking of ‘ispíní” and other breakfast foods in Irish Posted by on Aug 25, 2014

(le Róislín) I’ll take “an tsiosarnach” and “an t-ispín,” please.  Trying to “have” my “císte” and eat it too, I guess.  So, yes, although most of the time I try to have breakfast foods like iógart, múslaí, torthaí, and leite (le coirce “cruach-ghearrtha is fearr!), I have to admit I’m reasonably fond of the bricfeasta…

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The Parameters of ‘Pudding’ (Putóg et al.) Posted by on Aug 21, 2014

(le Róislín) So I thought I had the parameters of pudding pretty well parsed (putóg, maróg, milseog, all potentially in contrast to “custard,” a word borrowed as is from English), when I chanced upon yet another bit of “pudding” vocabulary.  I’ll leave it for a bit of cliff-hanger at the end of this blog. Where…

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Cá mbíonn tú ag obair?  Where do you work? (Workplace names in Irish) Posted by on Aug 18, 2014

(le Róislín) So the doctor works “san ospidéal” and sometimes “i gclinic.”  Let’s look at some more workplaces.  We’ll take some occupations from the previous blog (nasc thíos) and add a few new ones, some modern and a couple with a nod to “an t-am fadó.”  One, at least, is probably practiced more i gceantar…

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Cén post atá agat? (How to say what your job is in Irish) Posted by on Aug 14, 2014

(le Róislín) From “agraimeitéareolaí” to “zó-eolaí” (míoleolaí), we recently looked at a lot of “-ologist” occupations (Naisc thíos). But there are many other occupational terms in Irish that don’t have the “-eolaí” ending, which, after all, implies some kind of a scientist.  Some of the other typical endings include: “-óir” and its slender variant “-eoir,”…

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