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Tag Archives: Chinese

How many ways can we say ‘bliain’ (year) in Irish, including ‘athbhliain’? Posted by on Jan 11, 2016

(le Róislín) As we settle into the new year (an bhliain nua, an bhliain úr, an athbhliain, srl.), let’s think of how many ways we can say and use the word ‘year’ in Irish. Most recently, you’ve probably seen the phrase “Athbhliain faoi shéan is faoi mhaise” (A happy and prosperous New Year). But let’s look…

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Na Madraí Is Gránna ar Domhan (The Ugliest Dogs in the World) Posted by on Jun 28, 2015

(le Róislín) Bhuel, they say that “áille” is in the eye of the “dearcadóir” (or “féachadóir“).  And perhaps even more to the point, “Ní hí an bhreáthacht a bhruitheann na prátaí.” And I’m sure that all “úinéirí madraí” think that their own “madra” is “go hálainn.”  But still, we can probably acknowledge that some dogs…

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Chinese New Year in Irish: Cén tAinmhí (which animal) do 2015? Posted by on Feb 18, 2015

(le Róislín) Bliain Nua na Síneach agus Parthas na nGramadóirí.  Chinese New Year and this year, 2015, a grammarian’s paradise. Cén fáth?  Why? Because unlike previous years, 2015 offers us two, perhaps even three, animals as the symbol for the year. But choosing between animals would mostly be vocabulary, not grammar, right?  Like “sheep” vs…

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Ón Teanga Taíno go Gaeilge (‘barabicu’ go ‘beárbaiciú’) Posted by on May 22, 2014

(le Róislín) In the last blog, we referred to “séasúr na mbeárbaiciúnna” (barbecue season) while discussing the Irish word “citseap” (from the Chinese ‘kôe-chiap’ or its Malay variation).  This blog will look more closely at the word “beárbaiciú” itself, which, clearly enough, means “barbecue.”  Or should that be “barbeque”?  Or “bar-b-q”?   Or BBQ?  Or, “the…

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Cén Focal Gaeilge a Thagann ón tSínis? (Leid: Itear ar Bhrocairí Teo é) Posted by on May 18, 2014

(le Róislín)  Cén focal Gaeilge a thagann ón tSínis?  Bhuel, OK, English is a significant intermediary, but it is interesting to consider how certain words have become gaelicized.   Especially if they start out as something like “ kôe-chiap ” or “ kê-chiap ” (literally, brine of pickled fish). As you may have guessed from looking at those…

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