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Tag Archives: stail

Dhá Ainmhí Dhéag, Dhá Bhliain Déag, agus Cén Fhoirm den Alt? Posted by on Jan 27, 2014

(le Róislín) Seo (2014) Bliain an Chapaill de réir fhéilire na Síneach.  Agus cad faoi na blianta eile?  Agus na hainmhithe a bhaineanns leo?  So we’ve all heard that this (2014) is the Year of the Horse (Bliain an Chapaill) in the Chinese calendar.  But how would we say the other eleven Chinese years in…

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Cait: Cúpla Téarma Eile (Mothchat, Baldúin, Crúbálaí) Posted by on Dec 9, 2013

(le Róislín) A few more cat terms have recently come to my attention.  Let’s start with the rather eye-catching: mothchat [muh-khaht] tomcat Ar dtús báire, ní peata “Leamhanfhir” é.  Nó “peata Fhear an Leamhain,” más fearr leat mar sin é.  So, no, the Mothman of West Virginia (and of “Prophecies” fame) didn’t suddenly become a…

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Cialla an Fhocail “Log” (hollow, place, hollow place, etc.) Posted by on Aug 28, 2012

(le Róislín) In the last blog, we looked at terms for various types of horses (stail, láir, bromach, cliobóg, searrach, srl.) and at different ways to describe them, including the Irish for “sway-backed horse” (capall a bhfuil log sa droim aige / aici).  The word “log” in that phrase actually has many other interesting applications…

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Ón Searrach go dtí an Staigín — and my last excuse for “Slán Go Foal” Posted by on Aug 25, 2012

(le Róislín) As promised in the last posting, this blog will discuss the terms for the life cycle and various types of horse.  Most prominent, of course, is “capall,” but, as previous blaganna have hinted, there are téarmaí go leor to use according to comhthéacs (liteartha, srl.), aois and gnéas of the horse, and geographic…

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What’s the “Tuiseal” of “an Tuiseal Ginideach” Anyway? Posted by on Apr 5, 2011

(le Róislín) By now, you’ve probably heard the term “tuiseal” quite a bit in discussing Irish nouns.  It’s generally translated as “case” as in “an tuiseal gairmeach” (“a Shinéad” for “Sinéad” in the “vocative” case) or as in “an tuiseal ginideach” (“cóta Sheáin” for “John’s coat” in the “genitive” case), etc. Of course, this isn’t…

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