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Augustus’ 2,000th Death Anniversary Posted by on Aug 19, 2014 in Roman culture

Salvete Omnes!

Do you know what today is? I’ll give you a hint: the world has been planning and excited for today! It has been 2,000 years in the making. This date marks the 2,000th anniversary of Augustus Caesar’s death.

The statue known as the Augustus of Prima Porta, 1st century. Courtesy of WikiCommons & Soerfm.

The statue known as the Augustus of Prima Porta, 1st century. Courtesy of WikiCommons & Soerfm.

If you are not familiar with Augustus or Octavian Caesar, please refer to one of our past and information posts: here. However, this article is somewhat dated (2009) and I will be writing a new one soon. So fret not.

On this day, it should be known and celebrated that several archaeological sites have been brought to the attentions of the public. The demand for restoration, visiting, and access is a matter that now plagues the news and media beyond academics and journalists. Hopefully the world may see more sites restored and open for learning and inspiring.  The following place, the House of Augustus, is one of the areas that will hold special hours and be on display:

Fresco paintings inside the House of Augustus, his residence during his reign as emperor. Courtesy of WikiCommons & Cassius Ahenobarbus.

Fresco paintings inside the House of Augustus, his residence during his reign as emperor. Courtesy of WikiCommons & Cassius Ahenobarbus.

The Ara Pacis (Altar of Peace) will be open as well for extended hours and was aptly prepared for the ominous day. Namely the Ara Pacis will have a laser light projection upon it to show the original (or similar to the original) color palette. If you seek more knowledge of this famous artifact, you may also read on the Ara Pacis: here.

Ara Pacis Augustae, the "Altar of Augustan Peace", as reassembled.Courtesy of WikiCommons & Manfred Heyde

Ara Pacis Augustae, the “Altar of Augustan Peace”, as reassembled.Courtesy of WikiCommons & Manfred Heyde. For a colorful image; check it out here.

One of the most highly debated structure is the actual Mausoleum of Augustus, which according to The Telegraph:

“Officials have said the city of Rome did seek a sponsor to help restore Augustus’ mausoleum in time for the 2014 celebrations, but found no takers. With just two million of a required four million euros available, work will now be finished in 2016. (Kington)”

However unfortunate the finances may be, it is simply a marvel that such monuments still exist!

The Mausoleum of Augustus. Courtesy of WikiCommon &Soerfm.

The Mausoleum of Augustus. Courtesy of WikiCommon &Soerfm.

I find it marvelous the probably hundred if not thousands of events that will be taking place today in honor of this first emperor of Rome. A list of some of the more popular events including museum tours, educational talks, festivals, etc. are reported on this site by country: here. Also, here is an article of the events and places that Rome has to offer.

On a more personal note, I went to the Getty Villa Museum this last weekend (as I often go) I took a stroll around to see what I could find that was Augustan. Please browse my findings below:

Bust of Augustus Caesar 25-1BC in marble. Courtesy of the Getty Villa.

Bust of Augustus Caesar 25-1BC in marble. Courtesy of the Getty Villa.

 

Courtesy of the Getty Villa.

Courtesy of the Getty Villa.

 

Courtesy of the Getty Villa.

Courtesy of the Getty Villa.

 

Funeral Crown (perhaps Augustus wore something like this?) 50-25 BCE made from gold and glass. Courtesy of the Getty Villa.

Funeral Crown(perhaps Augustus wore something like this?) [50-25 BCE] made from gold and glass. Courtesy of the Getty Villa.

Well that is all I have on this news, but I am sure you will find much more information as the events of today unravel across the world! I hope that you take some time out of your busy day to indulge yourself in something Roman. From sitting and watching a Roman film or TV series to cooking a Roman meal (check out some ideas here) or maybe simply raising a toast to a man that changed the face of Western Civilization. Since it is from Augustus’ politics, beautification, laws, and standards that we have many of our current ideals, laws, and mores.

Valete Omnes!

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About the Author: Brittany Britanniae

Hello There! Please feel free to ask me anything about Latin Grammar, Syntax, or the Ancient World.