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Customs regulations Posted by on Oct 25, 2012 in Regulations

When you visit foreign country, you usually think about things you can bring and things you want to leave with.

As a member of the European Union, Poland belongs to a customs union – items imported into and exported from Poland within the territory of the EU are free from customs duties.

The official limits on duty-free items that can be exported or imported (per person over the age of 18) within the EU’s borders are: 10 litres of spirits, 20 litres of fortified wine, 90 litres of wine and110 litres of beer. Austria, Belgium, Germany, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, France and Ireland have stricter regulations concerning the limits on cigarettes for travellers coming from Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Slovakia.

When travelling to Poland from outside of the EU, one doesn‘t need to pay taxes on goods purchased for non-commercial use in the following quantities: 200 cigarettes, 1 litre of spirits or 2 litres of wine.

There are strict regulations concerning the export of works of art and animals, and limits on the amount of cash.

You can find more information at http://ec.europa.eu/taxation_customs/index_en.htm.

Do następnego razu… (Till next time…)

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About the Author: Kasia

My name is Kasia Scontsas. I grew near Lublin, Poland and moved to Warsaw to study International Business. I have passion for languages: any languages! Currently I live in New Hampshire. I enjoy skiing, kayaking, biking and paddle boarding. My husband speaks a little Polish, but our daughters are fluent in it! I wanted to make sure that they can communicate with their Polish relatives in our native language. Teaching them Polish since they were born was the best thing I could have given them! I have been writing about learning Polish language and culture for Transparent Language’s Polish Blog since 2010.