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Prohibition signs on Polish roads Posted by on Nov 30, 2011 in Regulations, Safety, Transport, travel, Uncategorized, Vocabulary

Few days ago I wrote about Traffic safety and road conditions on Polish roads

I shared with you a video about warning signs you may see on the roads in Poland. Today a little information about Prohibition signs.

No entry – zakaz wjazdu

No entry for unauthorized vehicles. Usually shown as a red circle with a white rectangle across its face.

No parking – zakaz parkowania

Amongst one of the most familiar signs, this sign is used where parking should be prohibited.

No overtaking – zakaz wyprzedzania

Either overtaking is prohibited for all vehicles or certain kinds of vehicles only (e.g. trucks, motorcycles, etc…) In the USA, this is usually phrased as “no passing zone”

No right, left or U-turn – zakaz skrętu w prawo, lewo lub zawracania

Either for all vehicles or with some exceptions (emergency vehicles, buses). These are usually to speed up traffic through an intersection or due to street cars or other right of ways or if the intersecting road is one-way. Indicated near-universally by an arrow making the prohibited turn overlaid with a red circle with an angular line crossing it.

Take a look at the signs and what they mean:

Do następnego razu… (Till next time…)

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About the Author: Kasia

My name is Kasia Scontsas. I grew near Lublin, Poland and moved to Warsaw to study International Business. I have passion for languages: any languages! Currently I live in New Hampshire. I enjoy skiing, kayaking, biking and paddle boarding. My husband speaks a little Polish, but our daughters are fluent in it! I wanted to make sure that they can communicate with their Polish relatives in our native language. Teaching them Polish since they were born was the best thing I could have given them! I have been writing about learning Polish language and culture for Transparent Language’s Polish Blog since 2010.