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Vocabulary For Food In German Part Two Posted by on Sep 17, 2015 in Grammar, Language

To carry on from my last post, which you can find here, I’ve made another list of translations of food along with their singular and plural forms. I’ve chosen words that are unusual that you might not know yet to widen your German vocabulary. Let’s get started:

Gemuse und Obst:

Vegetables and Fruit:

der (die) Granata(ä)pfel                               The pomegranate(s)

die Holunderblüte(n)                                    The elderflower(s)

die Maracuja(s)                                                The passion fruit(s)

der Grünkohl                                                     The kale

die Kirsche(n)                                                   The cherrie(s)

die Brombeere(n)                                           The blackberry(ies)

die Heidelbeere(n)                                        The blueberry(ies)

der Spargel                                                         The asparagus

der (die) Kürbis(se)                                        The pumpkin(s)

die Pastinake(n)                                              The parsnip(s)

der Ingwer                                                          The ginger

die Zitrone(n)                                                   The lemon(s)

das (die) Kra(ä)ut(er)                                     The herb(s)

die Lauchzwiebel(n)                                      The spring onion(s)

der (die) Lauch(e)                                           The leek(s)

die Petersilie                                                    The parsley

die Möhre(n)                                                    Carrot(s) – another word for “die Karotte(n)”

der (die) Blumenkohl(e)                              The cauliflower(s)

die Linse(n)                                                        The lentils

der (die) Champignon(s)                              The mushroom(s) – also known as “der (die) Pilz(e)” or in Bavarian “die Schwammerl”.

Nüsse:

Nuts:

 die Erdnu(ü)ss(e)                                            The peanut(s)

die Mandel(n)                                                  The almond(s)

die Paranu(ü)ss(e)                                          The brazil nut(s)

die Pistazie(n)                                                  The pistachio nut(s)

 

Alles andere:

Everything else:

 die Kirchererbse(n)                                        The chickpea(s)

der (die) Knödel                                              The dumpling(s) – these can be made out of bread (Semmelknödel), potato (Kartoffelknödel) or served sweet with plum jam in the middle (Germknödel).

der Hüttenkäse                                                The cottage cheese

der Ahornsirup                                                 The maple syrup

die Hefe                                                              The yeast

Hopefully now you can successfully go food shopping in Germany. Some typical Supermarkets in Germany are: Lidl, Aldi, Tengelmann, Rewe and Edeka. Don’t forget that supermarkets (and all other shops) in Germany are closed on Sundays! The only places you would find them open on a Sunday would be at die Flughafen (airports), die Tankstellen (petrol stations) or in die Hauptbahnhöfe (central stations). Otherwise the usual opening times are 7am till 8pm Montag bis Samstag (Monday to Saturday). You will also find no medicine on sale in German supermarkets (for example paracetamol); you can only buy them in die Apotheke (the pharmacy).

 

Have you ever been in a German supermarket?

Thanks for reading 🙂

Larissa

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About the Author:Larissa

Hello I'm Larissa. I live in Germany and I am half German and half English. I love sharing my passion for Germany with you through my posts! Apart from writing posts I teach fitness classes in Munich.