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Tag Archives: genitive

Latin Spells Deciphered from TV Shows Part I Posted by on May 31, 2019

Salvete Omnes, Many people hear the “Latin” and think – well no one speaks Latin anymore. Beyond the classrooms and religious building, Latin is most commonly spoke in the land of Hollywood. However, Hollywood does not always do their homework when writing Latin. First of all, why magic must be Latin is never made sense…

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Latin Words To Spruce Up Your Conversation Posted by on Mar 31, 2019

Salvete Omnes, As I am a former Classical Studies student and almost graduate student, I try to keep up on my Latin and translations – but making time can be difficult. However, I do try to use at least one Latin phrase in my day-to-day conversation to keep the language alive. So, I challenge you…

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Hobbitvs Ille: Part I Posted by on Aug 31, 2018

Salvete Omnes, I hope you have reviewed the previous blog posts for basic noun and verbs as well as some prepositions: Verbs  Nouns Part I  Nouns Part II Nouns Part III & Adjectives Imperfect Active Indicative The last thing we are going to review before translating is the Imperfect Tense of Verbs: The imperfect active…

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Back to Basics: Nouns Posted by on May 28, 2018

Salvete Omnes! Let’s jump right in. Last week’s homework answers are below: Translate from Latin to English clamas = you shout  es = you are  times = you are afraid  habetis =you guys are holding/having  Uocant =They call Translate from English to Latin It has =habet They enter =intrant You (s.) are afraid =times I do hide =Celo We…

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Guide to Impersonal Latin Verbs Posted by on Oct 23, 2014

The following is for your reference use for impersonal verbs.  Impersonal verbs usually do not have a subject or nominative instead there is an implied (he, she, it).  However they can take nominative in certain sentence structure. Most of these impersonal verbs will take either an accusative, dative, genitive, or rarely an ablative. followed by the…

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Syntax: genitive Posted by on Aug 31, 2012

The genitive is, firstly, the complement of the noun (it means that a noun determines another noun), but it still mantains some uses in Latin as a verb complement. Possessive genitive It expresses possession of something and, rarely, the thing possessed: Ager patris A person’s name in genitive complementing another person’s name was the way…

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The Genitive of the First Declension Posted by on Jun 1, 2010

The genitive marks possession. In the first declension singular, the genitive will end in -ae. Terra agricolae = The farmer’s land. The object being possessed comes before the possessor. That means that the actual noun in the genitive (agricolae) will come second. The -ae ending is also the nominative plural of the first declension. This…

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