How To Say “I’ve Been Doing” in Portuguese

Posted on 23. Jul, 2014 by in Grammar

Image by Jos Dielis via Flickr – http://ow.ly/zvbfc

Olá, pessoal!

I’ve been a teacher for over 20 years (please don’t do the math!) and every year both my English and Portuguese students have the same problem: the Present Perfect.

The Present Perfect, in English, happens in sentences like:

I’ve spoken to him many times.
Have you ever done this?
I haven’t seen him yet.

In Portuguese it can be translated in so many ways, but today we’re going to focus on the continuous form. First, let’s learn how to say “for” and “since” in Portuguese.

For = por, há, faz. It indicates how long an activity has been going on – it started in the past and it still continues.

for many years = por muitos anos, há muitos anos, faz muitos anos
for three months = por três meses, há três meses, faz três meses

When do we use por, há and faz? It all depends on context, there’s no fixed rule.

Since = desde. It shows when an activity started and it still continues.

since 1998 = desde 1998
since I was a kid = desde que eu era criança

Now, Adir, how do you say “I’ve been doing” in Portuguese?

Well, you can translate it as the Present Continuous, the Simple Past or the Simple Present:

I’ve been running all morning. – Estou correndo a manhã toda. / Estive correndo a manhã toda.
You’ve been working here for a long time. – Você está trabalhando / trabalha aqui faz um bom tempo.
He’s been talking to her about it. – Ele está/anda falando com ela sobre isso.
She’s been looking for you everywhere. – Ela está te procurando por todos os lugares.
It’s been raining for two hours. – Está chovendo há/faz duas horas.
We’ve been watching TV all day. – Estamos assistindo TV o dia todo.
They’ve been playing tenning since they were kids. – Eles jogam tênis desde que eram crianças.

So it’s kind of tricky to translate this verb tense into Portuguese – you’ll have to analyze the context. Don’t worry, Brazilians have the same problem learning the perfect tenses in English. So my piece of advice is: pay closer attention to what you listen to and read and try to understand the situation where it happens so you’ll know how to say that in English.

Take care and see you next time!

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Beginner Vocabulary: Food Part 03

Posted on 15. Jul, 2014 by in Uncategorized, Vocabulary

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Hello there!

Here’s the last part of our beginner’s vocabulary posts about food. Enjoy!

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no espeto – skewed
nozes – nuts, walnuts
óleo de girassol – sunflower oil
omelete – omelette
orégano – oregano
osso – bone
ostras – oysters
ovo – egg
ovo cozido – hard-boiled egg
ovos mexidos – scrambled eggs
pão francês – bread roll, dinner roll
pão de alho – garlic bread
pão integral – wheat bread, brown bread
para viagem – to go, take out
patê – paré, spread
pato – duck
pedaço – piece
pedido – order
pedir, fazer um pedido – to order
peito – breast
peixe – fish
pepino – cucumber
pera – pear
perna, coxa – leg
peru – turkey
pêssego – peach
pestisco, lanche – appetizer, snack
picanha – sirloin
pimenta-do-reino – black pepper
pimenta – pepper
pimentão – bell pepper
pipoca – popcorn
pistache – pistachio

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polvo – octopus
porção – order, portion
prato – dish
prato principal – main course
presunto – ham
purê – purée
purê de batatas – mashed potatoes
queijo – cheese
queijo parmesão (ralado) – (grated) parmesan cheese
queijo suiço – Swiss
quiabo – okra
rabanada – French toast
rabanete – radish
raiz-forte – horseradish
ralado – grated
recheado – stuffed
recheio – filling, stuffing, topping (pizza)
refeição – meal
refrigerante – soda
repolho – cabbage
rolinho primavera – egg roll, spring roll
rúcula – arugula
sal – salt
salada – salad
salame – salami
salmão – smoked salmon
salsinha – parsley
salsicha – sausage
sanduíche – sandwich
self-service / rodízio – all you can eat
sem carne – with no meat, meatless
sem casca/pele – skinless
sem gordura – fat-free, with no fat, fatless
sem lactose – lactose-free

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sementes de abóbora – pumpkin seeds
semidesnatado – low-fat
sobremesa – dessert
soja – soy
sopa – soup
sopa de ervilha – (split) pea soup
suco – juice
suco de laranja – orange juice
taça – glass
tangerina – tangerine
tempero – seasoning
tomate – tomato
tomate seco – sun-dried tomato
torradas – toast
torta – pie
torta de maçã – apple pie
uvas-passas – raisins
vinagre – vinegar
vinho – wine
vitela – veal
yakisoba – chow mein
xícara – cup

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How To Translate Verbs “Esperar” and “Chegar” Correctly

Posted on 10. Jul, 2014 by in Vocabulary

Image by remie4494 via Flickr – http://ow.ly/yYQvS

Hello there!

Today we’re going to learn how to translate two very common verbs in Portuguese: esperar and chegar.

Esperar

The verb esperar can be translated in three different ways into English. Let’s check them out!

01. to hope. The noun is esperança (hope).

Espero ganhar na loteria no fim de semana.
I hope to win the lottery on the weekend.

Esperamos que você possa vir.
We hope you’ll be able to come.

Espero que você não se importe, mas…
I hope you don’t mind, but…

02. to wait

Não tem pressa, posso esperar.
There’s no hurry, I can wait.

Esperarei aqui até você voltar.
I’ll wait here until you come back.

Ela estava esperando o ônibus.
She was waiting for the bus.

Por quem você está esperando?
Who are you waiting for?

03. to expect

Espero que você passe!*
I expect you to pass.

*This sentence can also be translated as “I hope you pass!”,it all depends on the context.

Não espere muito dele porque ele é muito irresponsável.
Don’t expect much from him because he’s too irresponsible.

Todos esperávamos que nosso time ganhasse.
We all expected our team to win.

Chegar

Chegar means to arrive, but we can also use “get” or “come”, depending on the situation. Check out some examples:

Quando o ônibus chegou, eu já estava na rodoviária há meia hora.
When the bus arrived, I’d already been at the bus station for half an hour.

Ele chegou bem cedo para a reunião.
He came very early for the meeting.

Os alunos que chegarem atrasados não poderão entrar.
The students who come late won’t be allowed to enter.

Quando cheguei aqui, a sala ainda estava vazia.
When I got here, the classroom was still empty.

Ontem à noite, cheguei em casa muito tarde.
Last night I got home very late.

Quando você chegar ao hotel, não se esqueça de me ligar.
When you get to the hotel, don’t forget to call me.

We translate chegar as come when we arrive late or early:

chegar cedo – come early
chegar atrasado – come late

We translate chegar as get when we mention where we arrive.

chegar em casa – get home
chegar aqui – get here
chegar lá – get there
chegar ao cinema – get to the movies

And to finish our post there are two very cool expressions with chegar:

Chega pra lá! – Move over!
Chega pra cá! – Come closer!

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