07 Expressions With Verb “Ficar”

Posted on 18. Sep, 2014 by in Uncategorized, Vocabulary

traffic

Image by Jonathan Kos-Read via Flickr – http://ow.ly/Bxbu5

Salve, pessoal! Tudo bem?

Ficar is a very, very common verb in Portuguese and it has several interesting idioms. Let’s learn them!

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

01. Ficar com as pernas bambas – to go weak in the knees

Não posso ver sangue. Fico com as pernas bambas quando vejo. – I can’t see blood. I go weak in the knees when I do.
Ele ficou com as pernas bambas antes de entrar no palco. – He went weak in the knees before he went on stage.

02. Ficar de olho em – to keep an eye on

Fica de olho nas crianças enquanto eu vou ao banheiro. – Keep an eye on the kids while I go to the bathroom.
Você pode ficar de olho nas minhas malas enquanto eu vou até o balcão? – Can you keep an eye on my bags while I go to the counter?

03. Ficar em cima do muro – to sit on the fence

Às vezes você tem que tomar um partido. Não dá pra ficar em cima do muro. – Sometimes you have to take sides. You just can’t sit on the fence.
Ela criticou membros do comitê por terem ficado em cima do muro e não terem feito uma contribuição útil ao debate. – She criticized members of the committee for sitting on the fence and failing to make a useful contribution to the debate.

04. Ficar vermelho/a – to blush

Ele fica vermelho sempre que o elogiam. – He blushes every time he gets a compliment.
Ela ficou vermelha quando percebeu que tinha feito uma burrada. – She blushed when she realized she had screwed up.

05. Ficar de boa – to relax, to take it easy, to rest

Hoje não vou sair. Vou ficar de boa assistindo TV. – I’m not going out tonight. I’m just going to take it easy and watch TV.
Fica de boa aí que eu resolvo tudo. – Take it easy and don’t worry because I’ll figure everything out.

06. Ficar esperto – to pay (close) attention; to be careful

Fica esperto com o preço senão eles te roubam. – Pay attention to the price so they won’t rip you off.
Em São Paulo você tem que ficar esperto com o trânsito. – In São Paulo you need to be careful with the traffic.

07. Ficar preso – to get stuck

Odeio ficar preso no trânsito de sexta-feira. – I have getting stuck in traffic on Fridays.
Você já ficou preso num elevador? – Have you ever gotten stuck in an elevator?

Por hoje é só! Nos vemos em breve!

Want more free resources to learn Portuguese? Check out the other goodies we offer to help make your language learning efforts a daily habit.

How To Use “Há” or “A”

Posted on 15. Sep, 2014 by in Grammar

livros

Image by az via Flickr – http://ow.ly/Bx4PT

Hello there!

If you’ve been studying Portuguese for some time you may have noticed that we have a lot of homophones – those words that sound the same but are written somewhat differently (homo = same; phono = sound).

As these words are confusing, many people don’t get them write when they write them. Such is the case of “há” and “a”. They sound exactly the same, buy are used in two different situations.

, when are are talking about time, means “for”. It indicates that an action started in the past and still continues into the present. Remember: há always relates to something that started in the past.

Some examples:

Estou estudando meia hora. – I’ve been studying for half an hour.
Ele é médico dez anos. – He’s been a doctor for ten years.
Não viajo muito tempo. – I haven’t traveled for a long time.

When you want to ask questions, use “há quanto tempo” (how long):

Há quanto tempo você está estudando? – How long have you been studying?
Há quanto tempo ele é médico? – How long has he been a doctor?
Há quanto tempo você não viaja? – How long haven’t you traveled?

We can replace “há” by “faz” in the sentences above.

Estou estudando faz meia hora. – I’ve been studying for half an hour.
Ele é médico faz dez anos. – He’s been a doctor for ten years.
Não viajo faz muito tempo. – I haven’t traveled for a long time.

In the question form, we add “que”:

Faz quanto tempo que você está estudando? – How long have you been studying?
Faz quanto tempo que ele é médico? – How long has he been a doctor?
Faz quanto tempo que você não viaja? – How long haven’t you traveled?

A

We use “a” when we indicate an action that is going to happen in the future.

Estamos a dois dias do evento. – The event is going to happen in two days.
Vou viajar daqui a uma semana. – I’m going to travel one week from today.
Estamos a dez minutos de onde você está. – We’re ten minutes (away) from where you are.

“A” is usually used in the following expressions:

daqui a pouco – in a while
daqui a dois dias – in two days
daqui a três meses – in three months
daqui a uma semana – one week from today

In spoken Portuguese it sounds the same, but if you want to write good Portuguese, remember these rules.

Nos vemos em breve!

Want more free resources to learn Portuguese? Check out the other goodies we offer to help make your language learning efforts a daily habit.

Grammar: Contractions with Countries and Cities

Posted on 12. Sep, 2014 by in Grammar

rio de janeiro

Image by Carlos Ortega, via Flickr http://ow.ly/Bome2

Olá pessoal!

Portuguese has some preposition + article contractions that foreign students don’t always get right. So first let’s review the most common contractions with em (at, in, on) and de (of, from).

Em

em + o = no
em + a = na
em + os = nos
em + as = nas

De

de + o = do
de + a = da
de + os = dos
de + as = das

 

When we say we’re in a country, use “no”, “na”, “nos”, “nas”.

Estou no Brasil.
Estamos na França.
Ela está nos Estados Unidos.
Eles estão nas Filipinas.

Exception: Estou em Portugal.

 

When we say we’re from a country, we use “do”, “da”, “dos”, “das”

Sou do Brasil.
Somos da França.
Ela é dos Estados Unidos.
Eles são das Filipinas.

Exception: Sou de Portugal.

 

We don’t use contractions when we talk about cities.

Estou em São Paulo.
Sou de São Paulo.

Você é de Houston.
Você está em Houston.

Ela é de Paris.
Ela está em Paris.

Eles são de Lisboa.
Eles estão em Lisboa.

Exceção: Sou do Rio de Janeiro. / Estou no Rio de Janeiro.

 

When use use streets and avenues we use “na rua” and “na avenida”

Eu moro na rua Roberto Liberato.
Ela tem um escritório na avenida Raul Furquim.

 

Some more examples:

Onde o senhor mora? – Moro em Brasília.
Onde o senhor mora? – Moro em São Paulo.
Onde a senhora mora? – Moro na Itália.
Onde a senhora mora? – Moro na Alemanha.
Onde ela mora? – Ela mora em Boston.
Onde ela mora? – Ela mora na Avenida Paulista.
Onde ele mora? – Ele mora no Peru.
Onde ele mora? – Ele mora em Portugal.
Onde eles estão? – Eles estão no Rio de Janeiro.
De onde ele é? – Ele é das Filipinas.
De onde eles são? – Eles são dos Estados Unidos.
De onde você é? – Sou de Pequim.
De onde o senhor é? – Sou do México.
De onde a senhora é? – Sou da França.
De onde eles são? – Eles são do Canadá.
De onde a senhora é? – Sou do Rio de Janeiro.

Por hoje é só! Nos vemos em breve!

Want more free resources to learn Portuguese? Check out the other goodies we offer to help make your language learning efforts a daily habit.