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Ti Piacerebbe Fare Un Quiz? – The Answers Posted by on May 29, 2018 in Grammar

Here are the answers to last week’s exercise Ti Piacerebbe Fare Un Quiz?

1. Laura and Eugenia discuss their travels

Laura: Do you like Italy? Ti piace l’Italia?
Eugenia: Yes, I particularly like Tuscany and Liguria. Sì, mi/a me piacciono in particolare la Toscana e la Liguria.
Laura: What about Lunigiana, do you like it? E la Lunigiana ti piace?
Eugenia: I don’t know Lunigiana, but I’d like to go there. Non conosco la Lunigiana, ma mi piacerebbe andarci.
Laura: Last May I went La Spezia, but I didn’t like it much. Lo scorso maggio sono andata a La Spezia, ma non mi è piaciuta molto.
Eugenia: Yes, La Spezia isn’t very attractive, and lots of people don’t like it, but I like it. Sì, La Spezia non è bella, e a tante persone non piace, ma a me piace.

2. Paolo and Fabio discuss food preferences in a trattoria

Paolo: Do you like mussels? Ti piacciono le cozze?
Fabio: I’d like to eat them, but unfortunately I’m allergic to them. Mi piacerebbe mangiarle, ma purtroppo ci sono allergico
Paolo: What a pity, I really like them! Che peccato, a me piacciono molto!
Fabio: What about the stuffed squids? I tried them once and really liked them. E i calamari ripieni, li ho provati una volta e mi sono piaciuti molto.
Paolo: Yes, I’ve heard that they’re really good, I’d like to try them. Sì, mi hanno detto che sono buonissimi, mi piacerebbe provarli.

3. Fabio and Laura go shopping for shoes

Fabio: So, do you see anything that you like? Allora, vedi qualcosa che ti piace?
Laura: Yes, I really like those white shoes there. Sì, mi piacciono quelle scarpe bianche lì.
Fabio: Well then? E allora?
Laura: However, I also like that green pair there. Però, mi piace anche quel paio verde là.
Fabio: So? Quindi?
Laura: I don’t know, I really like both! Non lo so, mi piacciono molto tutte e due!
Fabio: Unfortunately dear I can only afford to buy you one pair, so you need to decide which shoes you like most. Purtroppo cara, mi posso permettere di comprarti solo un paio, quindi devi decidere quali scarpe ti piacciono di più.

Want to have a go at a few more complex sentences? Try these!

1. Mario said that he really liked the tagliatelle with mushrooms. Mario ha detto che _________ molto le tagliatelle ai funghi.
2. We would have liked it if you had come as well. __________ se fossi venuto anche tu.
3. If Marco and Giulia like farinata we could go to Roberto’s pizzeria. Se __________ la farinata potremmo andare alla pizzeria di Roberto.
4. Do you like me better with the red dress or the black one? ______ di più col vestito rosso o con quello nero?
5. Lucia says that she liked you, Marco, but didn’t really like the way you dress. Lucia dice che _______, Marco, ma non _______ come ti vesti.

I’ll post the answers to the above in the comments section.

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Comments:

  1. Janna:

    The last answer in section two – “mi piacerebbe” I had as “mi piacerebbero” – thinking I had to respond to the plural form. Could you help me understand my error?

    • Serena:

      @Janna Salve Janna! You need to use the singular (mi piacerebbe) because it’s followed by an infinitive.

      If you use the method of converting ‘I’d like’ to ‘it would please me’ then it’ll make sense:
      I’d like to try them = it would please me to try them = mi piacerebbe provarli

      If the sentence was ‘I would like them’ then you’d need ‘they would please me’ = mi piacerebbero

      Saluti da Serena e Geoff

  2. paolo:

    1. gli sono piaciute
    2. ci sarebbe piaciuto
    3. Marco e Giulia gli piace
    4. Ti piaccio
    5. le sei piaciuto, è piaciuto

  3. Alexander:

    1. gli è piaciute

    2. Ci sarebbe piaciuto

    3. Se a Marco e Giulia piaccia

    4. Ti piace me

    5. le è piaciuto tu,… le piace veramente

  4. Joan Engelhaupt:

    This is about word order again. Once you said it could be somewhat flexible in Italian, so is it OK to say “piace a me” as well as “a me piace”? Thank you.

    • Serena:

      @Joan Engelhaupt Salve Joan!
      Yes, the Italian word order is flexible, but every single change in their position takes on a different nuance. “Piace a me” is very strong, almost ‘dictatorial’, it implies that there can’t be any discussion about it. E.g. Figlio: “Uffa, perché dobbiamo mangiare il minestrone tutte le sere?”. Madre: “Perché piace a me.” 🙂
      Saluti da Serena

  5. Gabriella:

    gli sono piaciute
    Ci sarebbe piaciuto
    a Marco e Giulia piace
    Ti piaccio
    le piaci, le piace

  6. Gabriella:

    Penso di aver sbagliato #5: propongo invece: le sei piaciuto, le è piaciuto

  7. Serena:

    Sono contenta, Tristian! 🙂

  8. Geoff:

    For those brave souls who had a go at the extra quiz at the end of this blog, here are the correct answers:

    1. Mario said that he really liked the tagliatelle with mushrooms. Mario ha detto che gli sono piaciute molto le tagliatelle ai funghi.
    2. We would have liked it if you had come as well. Ci sarebbe piaciuto se fossi venuto anche tu.
    3. If Marco and Giulia like farinata we could go to Roberto’s pizzeria. Se a Marco e Giulia piacesse la farinata potremmo andare alla pizzeria di Roberto.
    4. Do you like me better with the red dress or the black one? Ti piaccio di più col vestito rosso o con quello nero?
    5. Lucia says that she liked you, Marco, but didn’t really like the way you dress. Lucia dice che le sei piaciuto, Marco, ma non le è piaciuto come ti vesti.

    Well done all of you who had a go, these are tough conjugations that you’re not likely to come across everyday!

    A presto, Geoff

  9. Norma:

    Geoff, this link is unrelated to the current discussion but opens a topic that I hope you can address in an upcoming post.

    https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2018/05/31/the-code-thats-so-hard-to-break/

    • Geoff:

      @Norma Thanks for that link Norma, that’s an interesting post.
      I had considered doing something similar for Italian a while back, but skipped over it because a. there are so many other more fundamental things that need writing about, and b. a lot of these ‘filler words’ are mere sounds that it’s hard to capture in writing because they depend so much on the tonality or nuance that the speaker gives them.

      For example, two very common ‘fillers’ are boh! and ma! Then, of course, we have ecco!, allora?, insomma, and many others.
      But without context and tonality they don’t mean much in a purely written form.
      Although these fillers are extremely simple, it’s hard to use them convincingly unless you’re immersed in the language and culture of the place.

      I would suggest having a look on youtube. If you search for boh! and mah! you’ll find a few videos explaining their usage and context.

      A presto, Geoff 🙂

  10. Geoff:

    Pian pianino Tristian.

    🙂


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