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German Nationalparks – Part 3: Müritz Posted by on Feb 18, 2016 in Geography, Nationalparks, Travel

This is part 2 of the new series here on the German Blog, the German Nationalparks, a series on the 16 National Parks of Germany. Last week, I discussed the southernmost park Berchtesgaden, and the mysterious Schwarzwald before. Today, we will go into the north: to Lake Müritz in the Bundesland Mecklenburg-Vorpommern!

The National Parks in Germany (Image by Lencer at Commons.wikimedia.org under license CC BY SA 3.0)

Der Nationalpark Müritz

The last ice age created hundreds of lakes and moors on the Mecklenburgische Seenplatte (Mecklenburg Lake District). One lake turned out the largest by far: Lake Müritz. With 117 km2 (approx. 29,000 acres), it is the largest lake of the Seenplatte.

In 1990, the Nationalpark Müritz was established as one of the last acts of the Deutsche Demokratische Republic (DDR) (German Democratic Republic (GDR), former East Germany.

Much like the Nationalpark Schwarzwald, this park is split in two parts because of a city that is located in between. The Eastern part is called Teilgebiet Serrahn, and the Western part is called Teilgebiet Müritz. With 322 km2, it is Germany’s largest terrestrial Nationalpark.

What is special about the Nationalpark Müritz?

Also called Das Land der Tausend Seen (The land of the thousand lakes), the Mecklenburgische Seenplatte, with at its heart Lake Müritz is mostly special for its endless amount of lakes. The Nationalpark borders right at Lake Müritz. Just the Nationalpark itself contains more than 100 lakes!

Segeln (sailing) is great in this Northern-German area. There are many traditional old German Hafendörfer and -städte (Harbor villagse and cities) with events, like the Müritz Sail on this picture, a sailing event. (Image by Pesopesado at Commons.wikimedia.org under license CC BY-SA 3.0)

It is also well-known for its moors and forests. The area around Lake Müritz was already used a lot in the DDR days for agriculture and hunting. Trees were planted for business purposes, and so nature’s natural way of growing trees and wilderness was interrupted. Nowadays, a “renaturalization” should lead to more natural nature again. Quite in contrast with this is another part of the park…

UNESCO Weltnaturerbe (World Natural Heritage)

The Serrahner Urwald in the Nationalpark (Image by Ökologix at Commons.wikimedia.org under license CC BY-SA 3.0)

A part of the Nationalpark Müritz is protected under UNESCO Weltnaturerbe: the Serrahner Urbuchenwald (Serrahn Primeval Beech Forest). Buchen (Beeches) were once the primary vegetation in Germany, and these centuries-old trees give an impression of what the entire country looked like long ago.

You can visit this Urwald by foot, bike or by taking a bus. This must be wonderful to explore!

Have you been to the German Seenplatte? Do you know a place similar to it that you have visited? Let me know in the comments below!

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About the Author:Sten

Hi! I am Sten, and I am half Dutch and half German. I was on exchange in the United States, and I really enjoyed that year! So in that sense, I kind of have three nationalities... I love all of them!


Comments:

  1. Michael Brown:

    HI Blogger,
    I have a German friend who prior to the second world war lived I believe in this area. There were huge sanddunes reaching down to the sea. There he learned how to glide.
    I sense that this is done easily because of the continuous winds.

    Thank you for the informative description of German national parks. Two years we were in the southwestern part of Germany and visited the lookout at Blaubergen or Blauspitz that looked out over Germany, Switzerland and France. We love Germany.

    Michael

  2. I.T. Event Support:

    Thnx so much for this! I have not been this thrilled by a post for a long period of time! You have got it, whatever that means in blogging. Anyway, You are certainly somebody that has something to say that people need to hear. Keep up the wonderful work. Keep on inspiring the people!