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German Quiz: Mastering the Basics Posted by on Jan 17, 2017 in Language, Practice, vocabulary

Hello and welcome to another quiz! The first quiz of 2017. This time the topics are: basic conversation, numbers and renting an apartment. If you want to brush up on your knowledge before you take the quiz, then you can find the posts here, here, here and here.
Grab a pen and paper… good luck!
1. Translate these numbers into English.
Zehn                                                           

Answer

Ten

Fünfunddreißig                                        

Answer

Thirty five

Achtzehn                                                   

Answer

Eighteen

Elf  

Answer

Eleven

Neunzig 

Answer

Ninety

Numbers! Photo by Clyde Robinson on Flickr (CC by 2.0).

2. Translate these numbers into German (with the correct spelling!)
Twenty one

Answer

einundzwanzig

Seventy six

Answer

sechsundsiebzig

Zero

Answer

null

One hundred

Answer

einhundert

Twelve

Answer

zwölf

3. Translate these words into German.
You

Answer

du

I

Answer

ich

We

Answer

wir

Because

Answer

weil

You (plural)

Answer

euch

4. Translate these sentences into English.
Wie geht es dir?

Answer

How are you?

Ich habe hunger

Answer

I am hungry

Ich habe mich verlaufen

Answer

I am lost

5. Answer these questions in German.
Wie alt bist du?

Answer

Ich bin … Jahre alt

Wie heisst du?

Answer

Ich heisse …

Wo wohnst du?

Answer

Ich wohne in …

6. True or false?
If you rent in Germany you automatically get a built in kitchen.

Answer

False. You either buy your own kitchen or you buy the kitchen from the previous renter!

In Germany the first floor is called the ground floor.

Answer

True. In Germany the first floor is called the ground floor (das Erdgeschoss).

7. Translate these words to English.
die Kaution

Answer

the deposit

die Provision

Answer

the commission

der Makler

Answer

the Estate Agent

der Mietvertrag

Answer

the rental contract

Wohnungen. Photo by Steve Cadman on Flickr. (CC BY-SA 2.0)

How did it go? Feel free to share your answers or your score in the comments section below. I would love to hear how you did and also how long you’ve been learning German! I hope this quiz helped.

Tschüss!
Larissa

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About the Author:Larissa

Hello I'm Larissa. I live in Germany and I am half German and half English. I love sharing my passion for Germany with you through my posts! Apart from writing posts I teach fitness classes in Munich.


Comments:

  1. Dee:

    The numbers part was easy for me, but the rental information was mostly new. I got a little confused with the first floor question though. To me a building has a ground floor, then you go up to the next level which is the first floor. You’re not saying that that floor is called the ground floor in Germany are you? Or are you saying that in fact it’s the same system as in Britain?

    And when you say the next tenant has to buy the kitchen, do you mean that if they don’t it’s just a totally empty room? No cupboards, no stove, just walls and a floor?

    • Larissa:

      @Dee Hi Dee,

      In America people call the ground floor the first floor, which is why in German it’s a little bit different as they start with the ground floor! Here’s a link to my other post explaining it.

      Yes that’s right, if you don’t buy it off the people who lived there before you you literally just have an empty space! Just walls and a floor. The link above also explains that if you fancy having a read 🙂

      Thanks for commenting,
      Larissa

  2. Meg Lark:

    Just to note that I’ve spoken German for nearly 50 years, and while my skills may be a little “altmodisch,” I wouldn’t translate English “me” as German “ich.”
    “Me” is the accusative case, equivalent to German “mich”; the English-language equivalent of “ich* is “I”. Granted, nearly all English-speakers will answer, “It’s me,” but that’s because “It is I” is impossibly stuffy. And we also picked up bad grammar from the French, for whom the nominative first-person singular is “je” and the accusative is “moi” – but every speaker of French will tell you, correctly, that the answer to “Qui est la?” is “C’est moi” – It’s me. A German, however, would answer, “Ich bin’s” oder, “Das bin ich.”

    Anyway, short answer: me = mich, I = ich. So, das war’s, as we used to say in Walldorf. 😉

    • Larissa:

      @Meg Lark Hello,

      Thanks for commenting 🙂 I’ll change it to “I” to avoid any confusion!!

      I hope you enjoyed the quiz,
      Larissa

  3. Anita du Plooy:

    Thank you for the post…but I think your answers got a bit mixed up. It is confusing for a novice learner like me. Fortunately I could recognise the words and I think you must revise your post.

    Thank you for the good work you do.
    Kind regards
    Anita

    • Larissa:

      @Anita du Plooy Hello,

      Thanks for your comment and taking for taking the quiz! I have revised the post but can’t seem to find anything wrong with the answers? Do you have an example??

      Larissa

  4. kate:

    Hallo Larissa I started to learn German for a little while and found your blog occasionally on internet… thankyou for the good posts and looking forward to the updates!

    Kate