10 Amazing Ancient History Resources

Posted on 21. Jul, 2015 by in Roman culture

This week I wanted to review some great resources for learning and discovering the Ancient World. I have chosen five digital resources in which both the expert and novice can learn new and exciting information.

The reconstructed Temple of Trajan at Pergamon. Courtesy of WIkiCommons.

The reconstructed Temple of Trajan at Pergamon. Courtesy of WIkiCommons.

1.The Library of Congress (here)

The Library of Congress offers a sundry of information on primary and secondary sources. While the database is not the most exciting of this lot, the repetuation of the Library of Congress demonstrates the relevancy of these sources.

User: Advanced-Expert

A winner of a Roman chariot race, from the Red team.

A winner of a Roman chariot race, from the Red team.

Young aulos-player riding a dolphin: red-figure stamnos, ca 360-340 BCE, found in Etruria, (National Archeological Museum, Madrid).. Courtesy of WikiCommons.

Young aulos-player riding a dolphin: red-figure stamnos, ca 360-340 BCE, found in Etruria, (National Archeological Museum, Madrid).. Courtesy of WikiCommons.

  1. BBC Ancient History (here)

This website offers a limited area of coverage, but it does so in a manner that allows users to find information easier. All the information is categorized and laid out logically. However, this website is an archived website, which leads one to think that it does not receive adequate updates. This database does provide sources at the end of each article and the option for viewing galleries on the topic. However, the information is extremely basic and leaves more advanced learner wanting more.

User: Beginner, Intermediate

800px-Olympia_-_Hera_Temple

  1. History: Ancient History (here) 

This database is in partnership with the History Channel. The database is aesthetically pleasing to the eye and has an abundance of information.  The categories and areas of research are unparalleled to the previous sources. The database contains videos, photos, and tons of information. In addition, the posts and articles seem to be engaging and interesting. They resemble the “Buzzfeed” or “BookRiot” articles.

User: Beginner to Advanced

Commodus as Hercules, Capitoline Museums. Courtesy of WikiCommons and Marie-Lan-Nguyen.

Commodus as Hercules,
Capitoline Museums. Courtesy of WikiCommons and Marie-Lan-Nguyen.

  1. Ancient History Encyclopedia (here)

This databases is both engaging and colorful. The information is presented in a fresh and revigorating manner. In addition, there are various ways and methods for obtaining information from searching, indexing, timelines, or even maps. The information is constructed in a way that the beginner users would be able to navigate it well. In addition, the information is presented with pictures, videos, and references.

User: Beginner to Expert

10 AMAZING Latin Posts for the Latinist

Posted on 08. Jul, 2015 by in Latin Language

From the last two years as a Latin blogger I wanted to take this opportunity to go over my top 10 posts regarding Latin words, phrases, and quotes.

 

1.25 Latin Phrases Every Student Should Know

2.Latin: Love Quotes & How to write a love letter

3.Latin Profanity

4.Abbreviations in Latin

5.Popular Movie Quotes in Latin

6.Latin Facebook Challenge

7.Conversational Latin

8.200 Latin Roots

9. Popular Quotes Translated into Latin

10. 100 Most Common Latin Words

 

I hope you enjoy these and I look forward to next week’s post.

Roman Remedies for Hot Summers

Posted on 01. Jul, 2015 by in Roman culture

The Romans were no strangers to the summer heat.

In fact, the modern term: “the dog days of summer”” actually comes from the Latin ‘dies canincula’, the Roman term used to describe the stuffy, hot period of weather between July and mid-August.

The name comes from the fact that Sirius (the dog star) rises with the sun at this time of year, –and Romans thought it was responsible for the increase in temperature.

 

1. Frigidarium

The Frigidarium (1890) by Lawrence Alma-Tadema.

The Frigidarium (1890) by Lawrence Alma-Tadema.

The frigidarium was a large cold pool at the Roman baths where Romans went to cool down. For the Romans, a daily visit to the baths was an essential social event as much as it was an exercise in personal hygiene.

Modern alternative: Head to your nearest outdoor swimming pool. Toga optional.

2.Leave work early

Office Work.

Office Work.

The Ancient Romans did not do a nine-to-five day. In fact, the average Roman only had a six-hour workday, from sunrise until noon.

Modern alternative: Create an excuse to leave work early. Carpe diem!

3.Eat snow

Snow on the mountains of Southern California.

Snow on the mountains of Southern California.

While the rich patricians and Roman nobility would often have huge stores of imported snow at home to keep them cool, citizens had to visit the snow shop.

Modern alternative: Visit the ice-cream shop.

4.Turn on the air conditioning

Air conditioning units outside a building.

Air conditioning units outside a building.

The Romans were master architects and kept their homes cool during the summer months by employing a series of architectural tricks that provided ancient forms of air conditioning. For example, some rich residents pumped cold water through the walls of their homes to freshen their dwellings during the summer months.

Modern alternative: Turn on the air conditioning. Alternatively, if you don’t have air con, get someone to fan you with ostrich feathers.

5.Leave the city

285px-PompeiiStreet

Many wealthy Romans escaped the heat of the summer months by going to their country houses in the hills outside Rome. –Ancient Rome was a furnace in summer and the city’s wealthy patricians were fully aware of what is known today as the “urban heat island effect”.” They would retreat to coastal cities like Pompeii.

Modern alternative: Modern day plebs can book a weekend away in the countryside, while modern day patricians can just visit their country houses.